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ThunderDome III


(Draft X)

(UTD1.0) DEFINITIONS


(UTD1.1) WHAT IS THUNDERDOME III?: Thunderdome III is a 4X (eXplore, eXpand, eXploit, eXterminate) campaign for Star Fleet Battles based loosely on the original Thunderdome campaign by Les LeBlanc. Many thanks are extended to Les for all his hard work and the beautiful maps he produced (and are reused here)
(UTD1.11) NO "REALISM": This campaign is not intended to simulate reality in any way, but rather to present a style of campaign play. Do not attempt to argue that a rule is not "realistic" in terms of how something would work in real life. The explicit primary game design parameter for TD III is quick and easy campaign game play in the TD III style without any moderator. If you want to propose changing a rule, argue from a game play point of view (favoring ease and speed while maintaining campaign style) – because "realism" has been tossed out the window… You're not in Kansas anymore, Toto.
(UTD1.12) SPEED: The campaign is intended to be fast-paced. Time will be needed to conduct battles, but managing the game play of TD III itself is intended to be simple, taking little real life time (comparatively speaking), with most campaign-level actions performed instantly so that, when it is your turn, you do not have to remember much past what is simply shown on the campaign map and the campaign master spreadsheet.
(UTD1.13) PUBLIC KNOWLEDGE: Everything about TD III, at the campaign level, is intended to be public knowledge. While there's never an explicit rule that an announcement has to be made, practically speaking, and as a courtesy, you should announce anything you want to do at the campaign level so that your opponents know what you did. Normal SFB rules regarding secret knowledge or announcements apply during combat (note: no hidden mines or hidden cloaks – see below).
(UTD1.2) BPV: Basic point value. All BPV used in Thunderdome III is economic BPV as defined by SFB rules.
(UTD1.3) CAMPAIGN CYCLE: A campaign cycle (or cycle) is one complete set of player turns (see below).
(UTD1.4) FLEET: A fleet is a group of ships that are required to travel together. Players have a limited number of fleets and a limited number of slots in a fleet.
(UTD1.5) RANDOM: If a random roll or random chance is called for outside of SFB combat, then use www.pbegames.com/roller with a CC to the email addresses of all other players. During combat, use the client's roller.
(UTD1.6) RULES: Unless a campaign rules allows an action, it is disallowed.
(UTD1.7) SUPERMAJORITY: As used herein, the term "supermajority" means the following: 1) If there are two players, both must agree; 2) If there are three players, two of three must agree; 3) If there are four or more players, ¾ of all players must agree (round any fractions up). If a supermajority cannot be achieved, then the proposal is rejected.
(UTD1.8) TURN: A turn (or player turn) is all of the orders a player can or wants to do on his turn in the campaign cycle, plus combat.
(UTD1.9) VICTORY: There can be only one. Many players enter; one player leaves. Victory is defined as being the last remaining player on the Thunderdome map. (Practically speaking it is more likely that players will come to a point where it is obvious a single player will win and then end the campaign – but player are encouraged to fight to the bitter end. Not enough of that happens during campaign play in the SFB community!)

(UTD2.0) OVERVIEW AND SEQUENCE OF PLAY


(UTD2.1) OVERVIEW After campaign setup, play proceeds in sequential player turns. (A random roll(s) determines the sequence in which players take their turns.) On their turn, a players follows the sequence of play. During his turn, a player issues a limited number of orders to take actions on the campaign map, which may result in battles. See (UTD7.7) for which SFB rules are used and not used. After each player has had one turn, a campaign cycle is complete and the campaign year advances by 6 months. Campaign cycles continue until a player achieves victory.
(UTD2.2) OVERALL CAMPAIGN SEQUENCE OF PLAY After campaign setup, the campaign sequence of play is as follows. 1) Players take turns in their designated sequence. 2) After all players have taken their turn, just before the first player takes another turn, the campaign cycle is incremented, and NPEs receive replacements (if eligible). Incrementing the campaign cycle increments the year by 0.5. Turns that end in ".0" are designated spring cycles. Turns that end in ".5" are designated fall cycles. Play begins on Cycle 1.0. The default staring year in cycle 1.0 is Y165 (though a supermajority of players can change the starting year).
(UTD2.3) SEQUENCE OF PLAY DURING A PLAYER TURN Each player turn proceeds according to the following sequence. Sub rules under each step are not actually sequenced actions (i.e., the "a"-"d" under "resolve orders" are not sub-steps), but rather simply a description of how each step is conducted, with a few major rule concepts described for easy quick reference when referring to the sequence of play.
  1) Colonies, mines, and fortifications ordered on the player's prior turn now appear.
  2) Receive income from mines (mines are the only source of income).
  3) Resupply and perform campaign self-repairs
    a. Resupply and campaign self-repairs are applied instantly at this step.
    b. Resupplied ships regain all COs expended on prior combats, administrative shuttles, and expendables, but not fighters and PFs, for which replacements over spares are handled using an order point and BPV.
    c. "Extra" COs purchased with BPV are also replenished at this point.
  4) Define orders by expending order points
    a. Thunderdome actions are executed using well-defined "Orders" (see section 6). Unless specified as being "free", an order costs 1 order point.
    b. Players have a limited number of order points (one per number of players).
  5) Resolve orders.
    a. Unless specified otherwise, each order is fulfilled instantly and is executed in the order defined by the player giving the orders. Thus, for example, a ship may be overhauled with a shipyard activation order and then, on the next order in the sequence, the fleet moved to an enemy sector and engaged in combat.
    b. The following example orders are resolved instantly and in the order sequence specified by the player:
      Repair Fleet, Repair Ship with Repair Freighter, Revise Defenses, Shipyard Activation: Overhaul, Shipyard Activation: Inspect, Shipyard Activation: Refit, Refit a Fleet (different than SY Activation: Refit), Move Fleet, Organize Fleets, Replace Fighters and PFs, Scrap, Activate Shipyard (However, "Shipyard Activation: Build Ship" is NOT instantly resolved), Siege Roll, Tow Wrecked Ship, and Dead Drop.
    c. The following example orders are NOT resolved instantly:
      Establish Colony, Establish Mine, Establish Fortification, Activate Shipyard: Build Ship, and Build Shipyard (see rules below for timing).
    d. Moving into an enemy occupied sector, or an enemy fortification (even if you can destroy it), forces you to stop further movement with a fleet. In other words, an enemy fleet of any size will "pin" your fleet once you move your fleet into the sector having that enemy fleet.
  6) Ships forced to retreat on the immediately prior player turn now appear.
    a. A retreating fleet always arrives at its destination on the very next player turn – which might be your turn if you happen to be next, in the case you retreated on an opponent turn, but your arrival could easily be an opponent's turn.
    b. Due to the sequence of play, it is possible for a ship with depleted expendables and COs to be in combat again before it is resupplied. Thus, if there is any chance a fleet will be in combat again before your next turn, you will need to track any expendables still available to a ship until resupply is performed.
    c. Note retreating ships will require order points and must be defined in step 4.
  7) Roll for exploration of new sectors, after executing all orders.
    a. Because step 7 is after order execution, it is possible to move through an unexplored sector (i.e., skip over it) to another sector.
    b. Stated differently, a fleet must *end* its movement in an unknown sector in order to explore it.
    c. Until an NPE is "discovered", it does not exist. Period. (Ignore realism: Remember?).
  8) Conduct battles.
    a. Conduct battles according to SFB rules.
    b. A sector can never be "unresolved". Battles are always completed and totally resolved each player turn.
    c. Combats always take place in sectors; never in the warp lanes between sectors.
    d. Technically, used expendables are tracked until the next player turn where resupply is received. This may be necessary when a fleet may have to fight multiple times on different player turns until the fleet is resupplied.
    e. A carrier or PFT may break out spare fighters and PFs after combat is concluded, but before the advancing to the next player turn.
  9) Colonies, mines, and fortifications are destroyed or captured at this step (after battle is finished).
  10) Receive new construction (and new defenses) specified in step 4 and assign new construction to fleets.
  11) Record keeping.
  12) Advance to the next player turn.

(UTD3.0) public knowledge; time limits; player removal


(UTD3.1) PUBLIC KNOWLEDGE: Everything about the campaign level of play is public knowledge, and thus announced to all players. Any player can inspect the navy and review the orders of any other player, and all players are aware of the campaign map status at all times. Ordinary rules for SFB govern what is known and not known during combat (tactical intelligence rules are not used). As a courtesy, all campaign-level actions should be announced.
(UTD3.2) PROXIES: To speed play, proxy players (even multiple proxies) may define orders and conduct battles for any player with a player's permission.
(UTD3.3) TIME LIMIT TO SUBMIT ORDERS FOR CAMPAIGNS WITH 3+ PLAYERS: Because the campaign is turn-based, strict deadlines must be observed to keep the campaign going. Players should aspire to complete orders within three days. The basic rule is that each player has a maximum of one week of real-life time to submit orders, starting the day after the previous player indicated that he passed his turn to the current player.
(UTD3.31) FAILURE TO SUBMIT ORDERS: A player that fails to submit orders for his turn by the deadline forfeits his turn. No orders are executed. However, income does accumulate. A PLAYER THAT FORFEITS THREE CONSECUTIVE TURNS IS DROPPED FROM THE GAME. See provisions for removed players, below.
(UTD3.32) EXTENSIONS: If the requesting player states that he has pressing real life issues (which don't have to be described), and if the requested extension is one week, such extension is automatically granted. Otherwise, a player may request a longer extension to submit orders from a supermajority of the players. Players who expect to take a hiatus of more than a week or two, but who want to stay in the campaign, are encouraged to ask for a proxy to play his empire until he returns.
(UTD3.4) TIME LIMIT TO COMMUNICATE BATTLE SCHEDULE FOR CAMPAIGNS WITH 3+ PLAYERS: The basic rule is that each player has a maximum of three days after the submission of orders to communicate with each other and either schedule a battle or resolve it by negotiations.
(UTD3.41) NEGOTIATIONS: Negotiations are encouraged to resolve the result of a battle to speed campaign play.
(UTD3.42): BATTLES INITIATED BY THE CURRENT PLAYER: The current player (i.e., if it's your turn) is fully responsible to contact opponents and make sure battles are setup and played. A player that fails to attempt to contact his opponents by the deadline (three days) is forced to retreat through the warp lane from whence he came.
(UTD3.43) BATTLES INITIATED BY AN OPPOSING PLAYER: If another player attacks you, it is your responsibility to respond to get the battle resolved. If you fail to respond to a request to setup or resolve a battle by the deadline (3 days), you are forced to retreat.
(UTD3.44) EXTENSIONS: Either player may ask for an extension to schedule a battle. If the requesting player states that he has pressing real life problems (which don't have to be described), and if the requested extension is one week, such extension is automatically granted. Otherwise, a player may request an extension to submit orders from a supermajority of the players. Players who expect to take a hiatus of more than a week or two, but who want to stay in the campaign, are encouraged to ask for a proxy to play his empire until he returns.
(UTD3.5) TIME LIMIT TO RESOLVE A BATTLE FOR CAMPAIGNS WITH 3+ PLAYERS: Speed of campaign play is considered a high priority of Thunderdome III so that the campaign does not get bogged down and players lose interest. The basic rule is a battle must be fully resolved within 4 weeks, starting the day after the current turn's orders were submitted.
(UTD3.41) NEGOTIATIONS: Negotiations are encouraged to resolve the result of a battle to speed campaign play.
(UTD3.42) FAILURE TO PLAY: A player that twice fails to show up as scheduled, or twice fails to schedule a reasonable amount of time to play ("reasonable" resolved by a supermajority if there is a dispute) is forced to retreat. Such failure need not be consecutive. One such failure (only) is automatically excused if the player who failed to show up cites "real life problems" – which need not be described. Otherwise, only an appeal to a supermajority of players will excuse more than three failures to show up or devote enough time to play.
(UTD3.43) FAILURE TO RESOLVE: If significant play has already occurred, and the players honestly tried to duke it out, but the players just ran out of time, then the battle should (not "must") reach a negotiated conclusion. If negotiations fail, proceed to (UTD3.44 or UTD3.45).
(UTD3.44) EXTENSIONS: Either player may ask for a 1 week extension to finish a battle in play. If the requesting player states that he has pressing real life problems (which don't have to be described), or if both players request the extension (regardless of reason), and if the requested extension is one week, such extension is automatically granted. Otherwise, one or both players may request a further extension to finish a battle from a supermajority of the players.
(UTF3.45) APPEAL: If negotiations to resolve an ongoing battle fail to produce an agreed-upon result by the deadline, then each player submits an explanation of the situation, a battle plan, and a proposed result to all other players. A supermajority of the remaining players then decide which proposed result to accept, and may modify that result for good tactical reasons. In a two player game… you have no one to appeal to, so this rule doesn't apply.
(UTD3.6) OVERALL TIME LIMIT FOR CAMPAIGNS WITH 3+ PLAYERS: Just adding the above time limits, each turn (barring extensions) should take a maximum of four weeks: three days to submit orders, three days to schedule battles, and four total weeks to fight a battle. PLAYERS ARE STRONGLY ENCOURAGED TO BE FASTER!!!
(UTD3.8) NO SURRENDER: Players may not surrender to another player during combat. A player (not NPE discovered minor empire) may always choose to self-destruct during the self-destruct phase of the sequence of play, and in fact must do so if they "surrender". Only NPE minor empires are subjected to the SFB rules limiting self-destruction of units (i.e., boarding parties on board, etc.) A player should not drop shields just to give another player a chance to capture his ship (though this rule is not absolute since there are many reasons to drop shields during combat). The point is this: Death before Dishonor.
(UTD3.9) PLAYER REMOVAL: The following rules apply if a player drops from the campaign, for whatever reason, while that player still has units on the board.
(UTD3.91) VOLUNTARY RESIGNATION: A player that resigns from the campaign merely emails his intent to the other players. No explanation is needed, but feel free to pontificate if you must. All of the player's forces are simply removed from the campaign map. In effect, the player and all his units simply disappears from the campaign, even if in the middle of combat. If resignation occurs during combat, if a supermajority of the players agree, another player can step in and finish a battle in the resigned player's stead so that a battle may be completed.
(UTD3.92) INVOLUNTARY REMOVAL: A player is removed from the campaign involuntarily for failure to prosecute the campaign (see above). This is the only way to involuntarily remove a player from the campaign.
(UTD3.93) DON'T BE A JERK: Do we really need a rule to follow this principle? :)

(UTD4.0) THE CAMPAIGN MAP


(UTD4.1) COMPOSITION: The campaign map is composed of a number of different sectors connected by warp lanes, as shown on the pre-published map. The only method of travel between sectors is along the warp lanes.
(UTD4.11) SECTOR DEFINED: Each sector is defined by a SFB map that is 60 hexes by 60 hexes in size, surrounded by a death barrier.
(UTD4.111) DEATH BARRIER: A "death barrier" means that any unit that comes into contact with the map edge is destroyed (not adjacent the edge, but actually is moved into or forced to move into the map edge). Ships moved into the map edge explode normally in the hex from which they were forced to move into the map edge, possibly damaging other nearby units.
(UTD4.112) SECTOR TERRAIN: A sector may or may not have terrain, as described below. Once determined, terrain in a sector does not change. In some cases, a terrain overlay is specified (i.e., an overlay designed for use with the SFBOL client). The overlay is provided to all players for use with their local SFBOL client. Terrain placement on the combat map is otherwise described in the combat rules.
(UTD4.12) NAMING: The first player to explore a sector names it. The name remains immutable throughout the game. This is a family friendly campaign and may be viewed by the children of players – so if any player objects to a name as being inappropriate for HIS children, a sector must be renamed. Again, don't be a jerk. Either of you.
(UTD4.13) OWNERSHIP: A sector is "owned" by a player if the player enters the sector on campaign cycle "X" and remains in the sector until his next turn (campaign cycle X+1). Ownership of a sector does not change, even if the player subsequently leaves the sector, unless another player claims ownership. A player can take advantage of a mine or a colony in a sector only if they own the sector (see below). Ownership is automatically claimed if a player forgets to claim a sector but otherwise qualified to claim it. Specific disavowal of ownership is required before a sector is NOT claimed when it is eligible to be claimed (note a fortification can prevent transfer of ownership).
(UTD4.2) COMBAT: Combat only takes place within a sector. Retreating opposing fleets moving through a warp lane through which a current player is moving do not fight or interact. Combat takes place immediately upon the arrival of a fleet in a sector, but only if an opposing fleet or other enemy is in the sector. Due to the nature of the sequence of play and limitations on campaign orders, it is not possible for more than two fleets to fight at a time (a deliberate design parameter). Battles are setup and played using SFB rules according to the parameters provided below.
(UTD4.3) TYPES OF SECTORS: There are five types of sectors: Unknown, Home, Life, Mineral, and Dead.
(UTD4.31) OVERVIEW OF TYPES OF SECTORS:
(UTD4.311) UNKNOWN SECTORS: An "unknown" sector is just that: it is "unknown" whether the sector is "life", "mineral", or "dead". All sectors on the map, other than home sectors, start the campaign as "unknown" and remain unknown until explored. See the exploration rules, below, for determining the nature of unknown sectors.
(UTD4.312) HOME SECTORS: A Home sector is the starting sector of a player. A Home sector is both a Life sector and a Mineral sector (see below), and thus has a special advantage to another player if captured.
(UTD4.313) LIFE: A Life sector has at least one terrain feature that supports life. Life sectors produce no income (exception: Home sector). However, Life sectors have advantages that Mineral sectors do not have. Life sectors can support a colony, which provides a significant strategic movement bonus and can also maintain shipyards so that ships can be built, overhauled, and refitted forward of the player's starting sector.
(UTD4.314) MINERAL: A Mineral sector has at least one terrain feature that supports income. Mineral sectors gain none of the advantages of a Life sector, and thus cannot be used to support ship construction and provide no bonus movement (exception: Home sector). However, a Mineral sector can support a mine, which is the only way to produce sustainable income in Thunderdome III (unless you can convince another player to constantly give you dead drops of supplies – see below).
(UTD4.315) DEAD: A Dead sector has no special properties, merely providing a battleground in which to fight. A dead sector may support a fortification (see below). A dead sector might have terrain.
(UTD4.32) HOME SECTORS: A home sector is the player's starting sector. A home sector has permanent advantages over any other sector. These advantages may be captured by capturing a home sector. Note that capture of a player's home sector does not necessarily eliminate a player. So long as a player has a single small freighter on the map (i.e., any unit), he's still in the game.
(UTD4.321) LIFE AND MINERAL: A Home sector is both a life sector and a mineral sector. A single class M planet is defined in the center of the map (hex 3030).
(UTD4.322) MINE, COLONY, AND FORTIFICATION: A Home sector starts the campaign developed with a mine, a colony, and a fortification (see below). The mine, colony, and fortification can be destroyed or captured (destroyed only in the case of a fortification) per the normal rules below.
(UTD4.323) CAPITAL: A player has one capital.
(UTD4.3231) DEFINITION: The capital is an actual SFB unit represented as an LCD (large construction dock). The capital can be destroyed using normal SFB rules. The capital appears in any battle, in addition to a fleet, if present. Unlike other defenses, the capital (and other shipyards) do not take up MC slots in the defender's fleet (see below). Like other defenses, a capital (or other shipyard) cannot be captured; only destroyed.
(UTD4.3232) MOVEMENT: A capital can be moved to a new sector through a warp point. The cost to move a capital is 3 order points.
(UTD4.3233) STARTING CAPITAL: Each player starts with one capital and can never have more than one capital.
(UTD4.3234) SHIPYARD: The player's capital acts as a size class 2 shipyard (meaning it can build, refit, and convert any size ship). Like any other shipyard, the capital automatically join any designated defending fleet in combat. The capital does not occupy move cost slots in a defending fleet, does not need to fit within the command rating of the flagship of the defending fleet, and is added to the defending fleet regardless of any contravening rule in SFB rule (S8.0 et. seq.).
(UTD4.3235) REPLACEMENT CAPITAL: A capital can be replaced for 600 BPV. Simply build a new LCD and designate it as the replacement capital.
(UTD4.3236) BANK: Unlike a normal SC2 shipyard, the capital also serves as the player's bank. A player may store BPV (including starting BPV) in the bank. The bank does not pay interest or make loans. The bank may not be raided, but is destroyed (with any BPV in it) if the capital is destroyed. The bank is re-established if the player builds a new capital. Without a bank, a player must spend or lose BPV as it is received each turn.
(UTD4.3237) CAPITAL SUPPORTING REPAIR FREIGHTER: Each player starts with one large repair freighter, which is considered part of the naval support for the capital and does not count as being part of any fleet. Instead, the F-RL is associated with the capital shipyard. If the capital ever moves (UTD6.32), the free starting F-RL must move with it; however, no additional order points are required for the F-RL to move with the capital. The starting large repair freighter, like the capital itself, does not occupy move cost slots in a defending fleet, does not need to fit within the command rating of the flagship of the defending fleet, and is added to the defending fleet regardless of any contravening rule in SFB rule (S8.0 et. seq.). If destroyed, the free F-RL may be replaced by purchasing either a F-RS or F-RL supporting the capital, which then operates under these rules.
(UTD4.33) COLONIES: A colony may be established in a Life sector. A colony is an abstract representation which is not reflected in SFB combat.
(UTD4.331) HOW ESTABLISHED: A colony is established by a fleet of any size or composition. A fleet that already starts its turn in the Life sector expends one order point on campaign cycle "X", and then the colony is considered established at the beginning of the player's next turn the next campaign cycle). The fleet must stay in the sector during establishment; if driven off by combat, the colony is not established. If a large freighter is present in the fleet, the establishment of the colony does not cost an order point, but the fleet must still stay for the player turn. The large freighter must have at least 50 cargo boxes to use this advantage, but otherwise may be any kind of large freighter.
(UTD4.332) HOW CAPTURED: A colony may be captured if the enemy fleet enters the Life sector and also has a troop ship in the fleet. A "troop ship" must be designated as such in the master fleet chart or it's "R-section" description.
(UTD4.333) HOW DESTROYED: A colony is automatically destroyed if an enemy fleet remains in the Life sector after combat on any player turn. If an enemy declines to capture a colony under (UTD4.332), then the colony is destroyed. If not captured, then destruction is not optional.
(UTD4.334) STRATEGIC MOVEMENT BENEFIT: If a fleet is at a colony, even mid-player turn, then the movement from the colony to another sector via a warp lane costs no order points (i.e., it's a "free move"). This benefit applies each time the fleet starts at a colony and it can be applied to any of the player's fleets. Example: Player A wants to move two fleets that are in sector A to sector B to sector C and then in reverse back to sector A again. Sectors A and C are friendly colonies. It costs no order points to move either fleet from sector A to sector B because sector A is a friendly colony. It costs one order point each to move the two fleets from sector B to sector C (2 order points). It costs no order points to move both fleets from the colony at sector C back to sector B. It costs 2 order points again to move both fleets from sector B to sector A. A total of 4 order points are required for what is, effectively 8 orders (moving 2 fleets 4 times is 8 orders, but 4 of them are free).
(UTD4.335) REPAIR BENEFIT: If a fleet begins its player turn on a colony, and also the fleet expends one order point, then every ship in that fleet may perform D9.4 repairs. Note that a given ship cannot receive D9.4 repairs more than once before receiving an overhaul. If a "repair freighter" is present, then two additional benefits accrue: First, every ship in the fleet is treated as having a damage control one higher than its ordinary D9.4 value (i.e., a "4" damage control becomes "5"), and second, the repair order is "free" (i.e., it does not cost an order point to issue the repair order). Note that the presence of a repair freighter in a fleet allows D9.4 repairs outside of a colony, but is only applied to one ship per cycle. See (UTD7.5).
(UTD4.336) NAVAL SUPPORT BENEFIT: A player may at least one shipyard at a colony for building size class 2 through 4 ships (as appropriate for the size of the shipyard). See (UTD6.38) for conditions and restrictions on building shipyards. Shipyards are allowed to build, overhaul, refit, convert, and inspect ships. See (UTD6.37) for details on these orders.
(UTD4.337) SUPPORT UNITS AT A COLONY
(UTD4.3371) DEFENSES: Defenses (UTD7.3) may be purchased at a colony, but not moved. See (UTD7.423) for how defenses are combined with defending ships to form a legal battle fleet.
(UTD4.3372) COMBAT AND SELF-REPAIR: Shipyards automatically join any designated defending fleet in combat. See (UTD7.423). Shipyards do not occupy move cost slots in a defending fleet, do not need to fit within the command rating of the flagship of the defending fleet, and are added to the defending fleet regardless of any contravening rule in SFB rule (S8.0 et. seq.). After combat (i.e. immediately after step 8), as an exception to the campaign sequence of play, a shipyard may perform D9.4 repairs on itself every owning player turn without expending order points. On the owning player's turn, a shipyard can overhaul itself for 1 order point (1 per shipyard).
(UTD4.3373) SUPPORTING REPAIR FREIGHTER: A player may purchase a small or large repair freighter and assign it as a "supporting freighter" to a colony. A supporting repair freighter cannot move from the colony, ever. A supporting repair freighter, like a shipyard, does not occupy move cost slots in a defending fleet, does not need to fit within the command rating of the flagship of the defending fleet, and is added to the defending fleet regardless of any contravening rule in SFB rule (S8.0 et. seq.). (Note that a player can also purchase repair freighters and add them to fleets for moving around the map, however, such mobile repair freighters must fit within all limitations on fleets).
(UTD4.34) MINES: A mine may be established in a Mineral sector. A mine is an abstract representation which is not reflected in SFB combat.
(UTD4.341) HOW ESTABLISHED: A mine is established by a fleet of any size or composition. A fleet that already starts its turn in the Mineral sector expends one order point on campaign cycle "X", and then the mine is considered established at the beginning of the player's next turn the next campaign cycle). The fleet must stay in the sector during establishment; if driven off by combat, the mine is not established. If a large freighter is present in the fleet, the establishment of the mine does not cost an order point, but the fleet must still stay for the player turn. The large freighter must have at least 50 cargo boxes to use this advantage, but otherwise may be any kind of large freighter.
(UTD4.342) HOW CAPTURED: A mine may be captured if the enemy fleet enters the Mineral sector and also has a troop ship in the fleet. A "troop ship" must be designated as such in the master fleet chart or it's "R-section" description.
(UTD4.343) HOW DESTROYED: A mine is automatically destroyed if an enemy fleet remains in the Mineral sector after combat on any player turn. If an enemy declines to capture a mine under (UTD4.342), then the mine is destroyed. If not captured, then destruction is not optional.
(UTD4.344) INCOME BENEFIT: Each mine produces 100 BPV per player turn.
(UTD4.345) SUPPORT UNITS: Except as noted, support units (including shipyards) cannot be purchased at a mine. As an exception, defenses (UTD7.3) may be purchased but not moved from the mineral sector having the mine.
(UTD4.35) FORTIFICATIONS: A fortification may be established in a Home, Life, Mineral, or Dead sector. A fortification is an abstract representation which is not reflected in SFB combat. A fortification is in addition to any support units. A fortification may exist in a sector in addition to a colony or a mine.
(UTD4.351) HOW ESTABLISHED: A fortification is established by a fleet of any size or composition. A fleet that already starts its turn in the sector expends one order point on campaign cycle "X", and then the fortification is considered established at the beginning of the player's next turn the next campaign cycle). The fleet must stay in the sector during establishment; if driven off by combat, the fortification is not established. If a minesweeper is present in the fleet, the establishment of the fortification does not cost an order point, but the fleet must still stay for the player turn.
(UTD4.352) HOW DESTROYED: A fortification may not be captured, only destroyed. A fortification is instantly destroyed if an enemy minesweeper occupies the sector after combat of the current player turn, or if the owning player removes the fortification using the same procedure to establish the fortification. There is no other way to destroy or remove a fortification.
(UTD4.353) OWNER PROTECTION BENEFIT: A sector will not change ownership so long as it has a fortification. Additionally, a developed mine or developed colony will not be destroyed or captured by an enemy fleet until the fortification is also destroyed. Furthermore, the fortification must be destroyed first; capture or destruction of the colony must be done by staying in the sector for an additional turn. For example, Enemy Fleet moves into Sector X on turn Y. Sector X is a mineral sector having an enemy fortification as well as an enemy developed mine. Enemy Fleet contains a minesweeper and a troop ship. As a result of the minesweeper, at the end of Turn Y, the fortification is destroyed. However, the developed mine is not destroyed or captured by the troop ship. If the Enemy Fleet moves from Sector X on Turn Y+1, then the enemy mine remains. However, if the Enemy Fleet remains in Sector X on Turn Y+1, then the enemy mine is captured by the troop ship.
(UTD4.354) FORCED COMBAT BENEFIT: If combat takes place within a fortified sector, then only fleets belonging to the owner of the sector may disengage by entering a wormhole. Note that there is no other method of disengagement from combat. Note also a fortification is not destroyed until the end of the turn, meaning that even with a minesweeper an enemy must win the battle to remove the fortification.
(UTD4.355) MOVEMENT INTERRUPTION BENEFIT: An enemy fleet that enters a fortified sector must stop movement for the campaign cycle, even if the fortification is destroyed at the end of the turn by a minesweeper.
(UTD4.356) TRAP BENEFIT: If not destroyed, an enemy fleet that enters a fortified sector is trapped in the fortified sector (may not move out of the fortified sector on future campaign cycles) until it is either freed or until it makes a siege roll.
(UTD4.3561) SIEGE ROLL: A fleet may make one escape attempt per campaign cycle, including the turn it enters the fortification. A fleet that wants to escape a fortification may expend an order point and make a siege roll. Roll 1D6. If the roll is a 1-3, then the fleet is released. On the following campaign cycle, the fleet may move normally.
(UTD4.3562) DESPERATION: Before making the siege roll, a player may expend 50 BPV and then may roll 1D6 twice (order point still required). If either roll is a 1-3, the fleet is released and may move on the next campaign cycle. Before making the siege roll, a player may expend 100 BPV and then may roll 1D6 three times (order point still required). If any roll is a 1-3, the fleet is released and may move on the next campaign cycle.
(UTD4.3563) TIME SERVED: If a fleet fails three consecutive siege rolls, then on the fourth siege roll, the fleet is considered released and may move thereafter. (In other words, you automatically succeed on your siege roll on the fourth attempt). Extra siege rolls purchased under (UTD4.3562) do count towards the maximum total number of siege rolls.
(UTD4.3564) JAIL BREAK: A player may send a second fleet to enter the fortification using an order point to move an order normally. In this case, the player must also spend an order point to send the first fleet to move to a new sector. The first (leaving) fleet is instantly released and moves on the same campaign cycle, but the second (entering) fleet stops movement for the campaign cycle and subsequently must either destroy the fortification (with a minesweeper) or make a siege roll on a future campaign turn.
(UTD4.357) EFFECT OF FORTIFICATION ON FRIENDLY UNITS: A fortification does not impede friendly units. Note that the only "friendly" units are your own units; there are no "alliances" in Thunderdome III.

(UTD5.0) exploring the CAMPAIGN MAP


(UTD5.1) HOW EXPLORED: To explore a sector, simply send a fleet to an unknown sector. Once explored, a sector is immutable; thus, over time, the campaign map becomes fixed. The campaign map varies each time the game is played.
(UTD5.2) DETERMINE THE TYPE OF SECTOR:
(UTD5.21) ROLL FOR SECTOR TYPE: When entering an unknown sector for the first time, roll 1D6. On a 1-2 the sector is a Life sector. On a 3-4 the sector is a Mineral sector. On a 5-6 the sector is a dead sector.
(UTD5.22) CAMPAIGN BALANCING DURING EXPLORATION: Due to the random nature of sector types (the sectors and warp lanes are pre-determined), it is possible to have player A have too few life and mineral sectors so that player A essentially has no chance of winning. Thus, players have the possibility of balancing such random occurrences during exploration.
(UTD5.221) AUTOMATIC MINERAL SECTOR: Determine the player with the highest number of mineral sectors (not necessarily mines). If you have two fewer mineral sectors than that player, then you may invoke this rule (UTD5.221). When you explore a new sector, if you roll either a dead sector or a life sector, you may instead choose to automatically change the roll under (UTD5.21) into a mineral sector. You must still roll for terrain normally, but now you use the "mineral sector" column.
(UTD5.222) AUTOMATIC LIFE SECTOR: Determine the player with the highest number of life sectors (not necessarily colonies). If you have two fewer life sectors than that player, then you may invoke this rule (UTD5.222). When you explore a new sector, if you roll a dead sector (only), you may instead choose to automatically change the roll under (UTD5.21) into a life sector. You must still roll normally for terrain, but now you use the "life sector" column.
(UTD5.223) INDEPENDENT: Each of (UTD5.221) and (UTD5.222) are evaluated individually and separately any time you explore a new sector. If both apply, see (UTD5.224), immediately below.
(UTD5.224) AUTOMATIC CHOICE OF SECTOR: If you satisfy both of (UTD5.221) and (UTD5.222) at the time you perform an exploration roll, then you may forgo the roll and instead choose the type of sector the newly explored sector will become. You must still roll normally for terrain, using the life sector column or the mineral sector column, as appropriate.
(UTD5.3) ROLL FOR TERRAIN TYPE: Based on the type of sector in (UTD5.2), select the appropriate table and roll 1D6 to determine the type of terrain present. Terrain marked with a "*" is available as a map overlay provided with the campaign, and is overlaid on a 60x60 SFB map during combat. Otherwise, add the terrain indicated to the SFB map when you play. If you roll "special" then roll again on the "special table". NORMAL TYPE TABLE:
RollLife SectorMineral SectorDead Sector
1SpecialSpecialSpecial
2SpecialSpecialSpecial
3Class-M PlanetGas Giant & MoonsNo Terrain
4Class M Planet*Asteroid FieldNo Terrain
5Class M PlanetSmall MoonNo Terrain
6Class M PlanetClass M PlanetNo Terrain
SPECIAL TERRAIN TABLE
RollLife SectorMineral SectorDead Sector
1 Giant & MoonsSolar System Slice*Solar System Slice
2Gas Giant & MoonsRadiation Zone‡Radiation Zone
3Class-M PlanetNebula and Class M PlanetComet
4Class-M PlanetHeat Zone and Gas Giant & MoonsDust Cloud
5*Dual PlanetsSunspot Activity and Class M planet
(no flare, with shadows, star is in direction B)
Pulsar
6*Solar System SliceIon Storm‡Black Hole
‡: Any terrain marked by this symbol also uses the Asteroid Field overlay!
(UTD5.32) TERRAIN INTERACTION PLACEMENT: See the rules on combat for placement of terrain on a combat map.
(UTD5.4) NON-PLAYER EMPIRES (NPE): When you discover a LIFE or a MINERAL sector, but not a DEAD sector, then roll 1D6. If the result is a "1" or "2", then you have discovered an NPE. The following rules apply to NPEs.
(UTD5.41) IDENTITY AND TERRAIN: To determine the identity of the NPE, roll randomly from among the allowed player empires (UTD8.111). A sector with an NPE has a Class-M planet, unless the encountered race is Hydran; in which case the encountered terrain is a gas giant with moons. No other terrain is present. The current list of allowed empires is: 1=Federation, 2=Carnivon, 3=Frax, 4=Gorn, 5=Hydran, 6=ISC, 7=Klingon, 8=Kzinti, 9=Lyran, 10=Paravian, 11=Peladine, 12=Romulan, 13=Tholian (cast web only).
(UTD5.42) PUGNACIOUS, WITHIN REASON: Ordinarily, an NPE will fight, so long as someone steps up to play the NPE. However, their tendency to fight is tempered by reason, as follows.
(UTD5.421) SELF PRESERVATION: The NPE seeks to preserve its own assets. Therefore, self-destruction of NPE units (including by voluntarily running into the edge of the map or willful lowering of shields in the face of seeking weapons or mines) is not allowed during combat – unless – such self-destruction would be allowed by SFB rules limiting self-destruction.
(UTD5.422) AUTOMATIC ANSCHLUSS: If an NPE is confronted by a fleet that is twice its own total BPV available for that battle (see below), then automatically proceed to Anschluss (UTD5.44).
(UTD5.423) ASPIRATIONAL PLAY: In the spirit of good sportsmanship, a player who steps up to run an NPE should run the NPE forces as if they were his own empire and that was the only sector he had left. This is not a rule that can be enforced, as it is too nebulous, but it should be used as a guide when determining how to play an NPE and when to surrender.
(UTD5.424) HOPELESS SITUATION IN COMBAT: If players fighting a battle with an NPE agree that the situation is hopeless for the NPE, then the NPE surrenders. The battle is over and the NPE is considered "conquered". If the surrender occurs before combat begins, then proceed to Anschluss (UTD5.4A1).
(UTD5.43) WHO PLAYS? The following rule governs who plays the NPE.
(UTD5.431) ORDINARY RULE, CAMPAIGN PLAYER: Any one of the players involved in the campaign may volunteer to play the NPE, other than the encountering player. If an opponent cannot be found within 1 week of real life time, then proceed to Anschluss (UTD5.4A1).
(UTD5.432) PLAYERS OUTSIDE THE CAMPAIGN: Players outside of the campaign are ordinarily not allowed to run the NPE (due to the potential for abuse), unless a supermajority of the campaign players agree to allow a non-campaign player to run the NPE. It is possible under these conditions for someone who only wants a minor role in the campaign to run some or all NPEs. If any campaign player has a reasonable objection to the way an outside player handles the NPE during combat, then a supermajority of the players must validate how the NPE has been run. Otherwise, the scenario has to be restarted.
(UTD5.433) PLAYER SELECTION AFTER INITIAL APPEARANCE: Note that once an NPE has been established, any other player can run the NPE in the future – so long as the player who is fighting the NPE is not playing both sides.
(UTD5.44) HANDLING DISPUTES: Disputes as to who plays an NPE (either initially or during combat after initial appearance) are resolved by random rolls.
(UTD5.45) STAGNANT: NPEs never expand, grow, leave their sector, or generate income.
(UTD5.46) ORDER OF BATTLE: The opponent who first volunteered builds and initially plays the NPE according to the following rules.
(UTD5.461) FLEXIBLE: An NPE's forces are built each time they are engaged in battle, without regard to any prior engagements with that NPE (limited exception for losses, as defined below). The BPV available is calculated in three, easy steps.
(UTD5.462) STEP 1, DETERMINE BASELINE BPV: An NPE has a baseline (not total) BPV available equal to the BPV of the attacking force. However, the minimum baseline BPV is 250 and the maximum baseline BPV is 600.
(UTD5.463) STEP 2, DETERMINE LOSSES: Reduce the baseline BPV available to the NPE by the total losses from prior campaign turns.
(UTD5.4631) UNITS DESTROYED ON PRIOR TURNS: The baseline BPV available to the NPE is reduced by the BPV of NPE units actually destroyed in prior battles with that NPE.
(UTD5.4632) PLANETARY DAMAGE: The NPE is deeply concerned with preserving its planet. Although the NPE cannot grow, neither can it maintain its fleet if the planet suffers space bombardment (and this rule will discourage the NPE from using the planet as a shield against seeking weapons by causing seeking weapons to break lock on and track the planet). Therefore, every point of damage scored on the planet causes one point of BPV losses to the NPE baseline BPV.
(UTD5.4633) LOSSES STACK: Losses stack. Thus, a 120 BPV CA destroyed on campaign turn 1, and a 70 BPV FF destroyed on campaign turn 2, and 50 damage done to the planet on turn 3 would result in a net loss of 240 BPV in losses to the NPE's baseline BPV.
(UTD5.4634) MITIGATION OF LOSSES: Losses may be offset by the NPE capturing ships. See (UTD5.492) and (UD5.493). Briefly, the BPV of captured ships can offset losses, but not increase the NPE's forces past the normal maximum.
(UTD5.464) STEP 3, DETERMINE IF ABSOLUTE MINIMUM NPE BPV APPLIES: After losses, the absolute minimum BPV available to the NPE is 150 BPV. At this point, the number that is left after these three steps is the grand total BPV available to the NPE fleet.
(UTD5.465) SUMMARY OF BPV AVAILABLE TO THE NPE: The BPV available to the NPE is equal to its baseline BPV (which is the same as the attacking fleet, but no less than 250 and no more than 600), less any losses caused by planetary damage and destroyed units on prior campaign turns (though losses may be offset by captured ships), but regardless of losses the grand total BPV available to the NPE is at least 150 BPV. Therefore, the maximum range of BPV available to the NPE will be between 150 and 600 (and the 600 can only happen if the NPE has suffered no losses and the attacking fleet is at least 600 BPV).
(UTD5.466) COMMANDER'S OPTIONS (COs): Each qualified NPE unit (see combat rules, but most units) gains 20% commander's options pool under the same rules and conditions as any players' units. See (UTD7.A).
(UTD5.467) FLEET LIMITATIONS: The following rules apply to any fleet built for an NPE:
(UTD5.4671) ALL RULES THAT APPLY TO PLAYERS: The same rules that limit how a player can build a fleet also apply to an NPE. Thus, for example, the NPE fleet is subject to SFB rule S8.0, the limit of a total movement class of 5, and all other rules that apply to building player fleets.
(UTD5.4672) YEAR: The current campaign year defines what units are available to the NPE.
(UTD5.4673) REFITS: The NPE player cannot purchase refits with commander's options. If a ship has refits available by year, these must be purchased as part of the force BPV. As a limited exception, the cost of drone upgrades (including speed upgrades) may be purchased from the CO pool of a unit. Generally, the same rules and conditions that apply to the purchase of drone upgrades and extra drones apply to NPEs and players alike.
(UTD5.4674) DEFENSES: An NPE may purchase any defenses that a player could purchase, except as limited by this rule. Again, the total BPV of defenses and ships cannot exceed the BPV available to the NPE. The defenses must be accounted for within the MC limitations of the NPE fleet, according to the same limitations that apply to a player's fleet. An NPE may not purchase the following types of defenses: Monitors or any small ground base that has a phaser-IV. Large bases of any kind are simply forbidden in the campaign.
(UTD5.47) NEGOTIATIONS TO RESOLVE COMBAT: Negotiations to resolve combat are always encouraged in order to keep the campaign moving. However, due to the possibility of abuse, any player in the campaign can raise an objection to a negotiated result of an NPE fight. In the case of an objection, a supermajority of *all* players must approve a negotiated settlement to combat.
(UTD5.48) REPAIRS; OVERHAUL: NPEs have superior repair capabilities relative to player empires. All NPE units not totally destroyed or captured at the end of the scenario are completely overhauled at the conclusion of the scenario (i.e., even before the next player's turn).
(UTD5.49) REPLACEMENTS AND CAPTURED SHIPS: The following rules apply to NPE replacements and captured ships.
(UTD5.491) NO REPLACEMENTS: An NPE cannot replace destroyed units or grow in any way, except to offset losses by capturing enemy ships (UTD5.492) or (UTD5.493). (UTD5.492) CAPTURED SHIPS: An NPE can capture ships. If an NPE captures an enemy ship, the ship is NOT added to the NPE fleet. Instead, the BPV of the captured ship can be used to offset losses incurred by the NPE as a result of destroyed ships. This offset can be held in reserve. For example, Frank attacks an NPE and gets trounced. The NPE captures one of Frank's DDs (100 BPV) and none of the NPE units are lost (many were crippled, but none lost, so there's no BPV loss to the NPE). Matt then attacks the same NPE on another turn and destroy a 150 BPV CA of the NPE, but is then forced to retreat. On yet another turn Charles attacks the same NPE. The NPE then uses the 100 BPV offset from the captured DD to offset the loss of the NPE CA, so the net BPV loss to the NPE is 150-100 = 50 BPV.
(UTD5.495) GIVING AN NPE A SHIP: Theoretically, a player should fly a unit into an NPE sector, drop shields, surrender and allow a ship to be captured. This action is allowed (presumably to make an NPE stronger so that it serves as a blocking force against another player). In this event, the ship is considered "captured" (UTD5.4942). Note that when an NPE captures a ship, the only benefit it gets is the ability to offset losses.
(UTD5.4A) REWARDS
(UTD5.4A1) ANSCHLUSS: If you achieved the result of "Anschluss" (normally only when at battle start you double the NPE fleet grand total BPV, or if no one will play the NPE) then the NPE surrenders to you willingly. In this event, you instantly gain a developed colony or developed mine (as appropriate for the sector type) plus 1 or 2 ships of the NPE totaling 150 BPV that join your cause. These ships are treated as captured ships and must be organized (See UTD6.3I) and inspected at a shipyard (See UTD6.377).
(UTD5.4A2) REWARDS FOR CONQUERING AN NPE: If you conquer an NPE in battle (in addition to any ships you captured, which will require organization and inspection), you gain an instant 150 BPV bonus from looting the planet and/or from tribute. The sector remains a life or mineral sector, as appropriate. The NPE was considered to have possessed a developed colony or mine, as appropriate, which is now resolved according to normal campaign rules. Thus, the colony or mine is destroyed (and must be rebuilt) upon being conquered, unless your fleet has a troop ship, in which case the colony or mine is instead captured.

(UTD6.0) campaign orders


(UTD6.1) DEFINITION AND TIMING: In Thunderdome III, actions are accomplished using orders, which are limited by how many "order points" a player has available.
(UTD6.11) ONLY PRE-DEFINED ORDERS ALLOWED: Unless allowed, an order is disallowed.
(UTD6.12) TIMING: Follow the sequence of play and the rules for specifics orders, below, to see when orders are accomplished. The following also defines how and when orders are accomplished.
(UTD6.121) GENERAL RULE, INSTANT: Unless explicitly stated otherwise, an order is accomplished instantly.
(UTD6.122) GENERAL RULE, PLAYER-DEFINED SEQUENCE: Unless, due to timing or interruptions, something prevents instant actualization of an order, the player issuing the orders defines the sequence in which the orders take place. In other words, the general rule is that a player defines the sequence in which his order are executed. However, if an order takes longer than instant to accomplish, this fact may prevent a subsequent order from being issued. Similarly, if something interrupts your ability to issue orders with respect to a fleet, then you can no longer issue orders to that fleet.
(UTD6.123) EXAMPLES OF NON-INSTANT ORDERS: Examples of orders that are NOT instant: build ship (ship does not appear until the end of your current turn, after combat); build shipyard (SY does not appear until the end of your current turn, after combat); build mine, colony, or fortification (does not appear until the very beginning of your NEXT turn); revise defenses (does not appear until the end of your current turn, after combat).
(UTD6.124) IMPLICATIONS OF INSTANT ORDERS, EXAMPLE: Thus, for example, an order to overhaul a ship is instantly accomplished. In the next order in the sequence of orders give, the player can issue a move order to the fleet containing the overhauled ship to move the fleet to new sector (potentially to fight).
(UTD6.125) EXAMPLE OF INTERRUPTION OR INTERVENING EVENT: Note also that certain intervening events can interrupt your flow of orders. For example, if you issue a move order to move a fleet into a sector containing either 1) an enemy fleet (no matter how small) or 2) an enemy fortification, your fleet is required to stop moving for the rest of your turn. Thus, you can no longer issue a move order to such a fleet; however, you could move another fleet into that sector (it is also "stuck" for the turn) and then issue an organize fleets order, which instantly reorganizes units in the two fleets prior to combat (presumably to optimize your fleet for the coming combat phase).
(UTD6.13) VALUE: Unless otherwise designated, any order costs one order point, though certain order types (e.g. move fleet from a developed colony) are "free" (does not cost an order point to execute that order). Examples of orders that cost more than one order point are "move capital" (3 order points) and "organize fleets" among 3 or more fleets (the number of order points used is equal to the number of fleets you are organizing, minus 1, which allows you to mix and match units among all the fleets you are organizing).
(UTD6.2) NUMBER: Each turn a player receives a number of order points equal to the number of players in the campaign. This number can be increased.
(UTD6.21) TEMPORARY EXTRA ORDER POINTS: For 100 BPV, a player may purchase one extra order point for that turn only. For 200 BPV a player may purchase two extra order points for that turn only. For 400 BPV a player may purchase three extra order points for that turn only. These numbers state the actual BPV values for the number of order points received; do not add these costs (in other words, if you want 3 extra order points in one turn, just pay 400 BPV and you're done).
(UTD6.22) PERMANENT EXTRA ORDER POINTS: For 750 BPV, a player may purchase one extra order point for the remainder the game. A player may purchase up to a total of three order points in this manner.
(UTD6.23) INTERACTION OF TYPES OF EXTRA ORDER POINTS: If you buy permanent order points, the effect is like buying a temporary order point for the rest of the game; they do not stack. What that means is that if you buy a permanent order point, then each turn that permanent order point is considered your first temporary order point purchased for that turn. Thus, if you already have one permanent order point and feel like you need another order point that turn, then you have to pay 200 BPV for the temporary order point you want that turn (i.e., the temporary order point is considered your second one purchased). It also means that, in the event that you have three permanent order points purchased, you can never buy more temporary order points.
(UTD6.3) TYPES OF ORDERS: The following are the types of orders that may be performed in Thunderdome III
(UTD6.31) MOVE A FLEET: The fleet instantly moves down one warp lane to a sector. Note that a move order is free when issued at an owned Colony. A move order may be given multiple times to the same fleet (i.e., a single fleet could move three times for three move order points). A fleet is forced to stop moving for the rest of the turn if it: 1) encounters an enemy fleet, or 2) enters a sector with an enemy fortification (friendly fortifications do not hinder movement). It is possible to move through an unknown sector without exploring it.
(UTD6.32) MOVE CAPITAL: The player may instantly move his capital down a warplane using 3 order points.
(UTD6.321) NO FREE MOVEMENT: A capital may not take advantage of the free move afforded by a colony.
(UTD6.322) ONCE PER TURN: The capital may only move once per campaign cycle.
(UTD6.323) ONLY THE CAPITAL CAN MOVE: Other kinds of shipyards cannot be moved.
(UTD6.324) FREE LUNCH: The large repair freighter associated with the capital moves with the capital without expending additional order points.
(UTD6.325) MOVING DEFENSES ASSIGNED TO A CAPITAL: As a sole exception to moving defending units on the campaign map, any defending units assigned to a capital may also move with the capital if another order point is spent (which movement is not free even if the order is given a developed colony). Thus, for 4 order points, you can move the capital and any defending units assigned to it. However, you may not move defending units with the capital if the sector to which you are moving currently has defenses, and the total combined defenses would violate the rules limiting how many defenses you have.
(UTD6.33) ORGANIZE FLEETS: An order point allows a player to instantly transfer any number of ships and supplies between two (and only two) fleets, or between a single fleet and ships in dry dock in any number of shipyards in the sector (See (UTD7.66)). This same order also (simultaneously) allows a player to transfer extra commander's options and legendary officers between either fleets or to different ships in the same fleet (though note restrictions to transfers by legendary officers and the amount of commander's options a ship can hold). Transfers between three fleets can be accomplished amongst each other with 2 order points. Transfers between four fleets can be accomplished amongst each other with 3 order points. If two or more fleets are sent to a sector holding enemy ships, this order may be used to reorganize fleets just prior to combat.
(UTD6.34) ESTABLISH A COLONY: A fleet may establish a colony at a life planet using this order. To issue this order, a fleet must *start* its turn in the Life sector. If a large cargo freighter is present in the fleet (a freighter with at least two cargo containers), then the establish order is free. A the fleet must remain in the sector for the rest of the turn while establishing a colony. See (UTD4.33) for other rules on colony production.
(UTD6.35) ESTABLISH A MINE: A fleet may establish a mine at a mineral planet using this order. To issue this order, a fleet must *start* its turn in the Mineral sector. If a large cargo freighter is present in the fleet (a freighter with at least two cargo containers), then the establish order is free. A fleet must remain in the sector for the rest of the turn while establishing a mine. See (UTD4.34) for other rules on mine production.
(UTD6.36) ESTABLISH A FORTIFICATION: A fleet may establish a fortification at any planet using this order. To issue this order, a fleet must *start* its turn in the sector. If a minesweeper is present in the fleet, then the establish order is free. A fleet must remain in the sector for the rest of the turn while establishing a fortification. See (UTD4.35) for other rules on fortification production.
(UTD6.37) ACTIVATE SHIPYARD: All shipyards (including the capital) in a single sector may be instantly activated for one order point. Note (UTD6.3H): a shipyard can't take any shipyard actions when it is overhauled and only can use half of its capacity when it performs D9.4 repairs on itself. Note that while the SY Activation Order is "instant", receipt of a ship built as a result of activating a SY is not complete until the end of the current player turn. Thus, overhauling, inspecting, and converting ships is done instantly and in the sequence a player specifies on his turn, receipt of a ship built a result of the Activate Shipyard: Build Ship order, is not conducted until the end of the current player turn.
(UTD6.371) ACTIVATE SHIPYARD: MULTI-TASKING: The fundamental order, using one order point, is to activate all shipyards present in a single sector. The "activate shipyard" order activates the entire capacity of all shipyards in the sector. An activated shipyard can build, overhaul, refit, convert, and inspect ships all in the same turn, within the shipyard's capacity. All relevant rules for each action sub-type must be observed, though an activated shipyard can combine any of the five sub types of orders (build, overhaul, refit, convert, or inspect ships) within the shipyard's capacity limits.
(UTD6.372) SHIPYARD CAPACITY: Each shipyard has a shipyard capacity, noted on the chart below.
Shipyard TypeShipyard Capacity
Capital2
SC 2
(Not the Capital)
1.5
SC 31
SC 40.67

(UTD6.3721) An activated shipyard can perform shipyard actions (build, overhaul, refit, convert, inspect) on a number of ships equal to the combined move class values of those ships relative to the shipyard capacity.
(UTD6.3722) BRIEF EXAMPLE: For example, the capital can perform activated shipyard actions on two cruisers of MC1 (because their combined MC (2) is equal to the capital's capacity). In another example, the capital can perform activated shipyard actions on six FFs of MC 0.33 (because their combined MC (2) is equal to the capital's capacity). See below for a more complete integrated example.
(UTD6.3723) UNUSED CAPACITY: Unused shipyard capacity on a given turn is wasted for that turn (i.e., unused capacity does not carry over from turn to turn).
(UTD6.3724) DAMAGED SHIPYARDS: A damaged shipyard has a reduced capacity equal to the percentage of works boxes it has damaged.
(UTD6.3725) SHIPYARD UNDER D9.4 REPAIRS: A shipyard receiving D9.4 repairs from a "repair shipyard" order (UTD6.3H) repairs all its works, but has only half it's capacity available for the turn.
(UTD6.3726) SHIPYARD UNDER OVERHAUL: A shipyard being overhauled under a "repair shipyard" order (UTD6.3H) cannot perform shipyard actions on the turn it is overhauled.
(UTD6.373) BUILD SHIP (ACTIVATED SHIPYARD ACTION SUB-TYPE): The following rules apply to building ships at an activated shipyard.
(UTD6.3731) TYPE: Shipyards only build warships and freighters. Fighters and PFs are replaced with a separate order (UTD6.3G) and are not built using shipyards. Commander's options are replaced automatically each turn and additional or revised commander's options are provided as part of a refit fleet order (UTD6.3C). Defenses (including monitors and small ground bases and any attrition units built with other defenses) are built with a separate order (UTD6.3F) and are not built using shipyards.
(UTD6.3732) SIZE: The maximum size ship a shipyard can build is equal to the size class of the shipyard. Example: the capital is a SC2 shipyard, and thus can produce a maximum size of a SC2 ship. However, a SC4 shipyard can only build SC4 ships. A ship may be built at a shipyard of a size class larger than the ship.
(UTD6.3733) SHIPYARD CAPACITY USED AND COST: Building a ship uses an amount of shipyard capacity equal to the move class of the ship being built. The cost of building the ship equals its BPV.
(UTD6.3734) WHEN RECEIVED: Any ships produced by a shipyard are received at the end of the player turn, as indicated in the sequence of play. The ships may be placed into the same or different fleets for no additional order points.
(UTD6.3735) BUILDING SHIPS INTO DRY DOCK: If the player has no available fleets and cannot form a new fleet, the ship is considered in "dry dock" (docked to the capital or shipyard and unable to power systems; all of its internal boxes are destroyed on "cargo" hits, but it is protected the shields of the capital or shipyard). See (UTD7.6) for details and restrictions on placing ships in dry dock. If no dry dock positions are open, the build order cannot be given.
(UTD6.374) OVERHAUL SHIP (ACTIVATED SHIPYARD ACTION SUB-TYPE): The following rules apply to overhauling ships at an activated shipyard.
(UTD6.3741) EFFECT OF OVERHAUL: Overhauling a ship completely repairs the ship, and resets the ability of the ship to receive D9.4 repairs.
(UTD6.3742) WHERE PERFORMED: A ship can only be overhauled at a shipyard of appropriate size class *and* capacity. In other words, if your battleship is crippled, it can ONLY be repaired at a SC2 shipyard with a capacity of 2 (e.g., your capital). A ship may be overhauled at a shipyard of a size class larger than the ship.
(UTD6.3743) SHIPYARD CAPACITY USED AND COST: Overhauling a ship uses an amount of shipyard capacity equal to the move class of the ship being overhauled. The cost of overhauling the ship equals 10% of its BPV.
(UTD6.3744) COMBINATION WITH REFIT OR CONVERSION: A ship undergoing an overhaul may be refitted or converted without using extra shipyard capacity. Simply issue the order to overhaul, indicate the refit or conversion, and pay the BPV cost as indicated by those rules. The cost over overhauling the ship is paid in addition to the refit or conversion (based on the cost of the original ship).
(UTD6.375) REFIT SHIP (ACTIVATED SHIPYARD ACTION SUB-TYPE): The following rules apply to refitting ships at an activated shipyard.
(UTD6.3751) INTERACTION WITH "REFIT FLEET" ORDER: This order is different than the "refit fleet" order (UTD6.3J). While (UTD6.3J) allows the entire fleet to be refitted with a single move order, this order allows otherwise unused shipyard capacity to refit individual fleets without having to expend additional order points. Because the Activate Shipyard order is flexible (i.e., SY capacity can be used to perform a variety of different actions within the SY's capacity), it is possible to, say, build a ship and then use some of the unused SY capacity to refit a single ship without expending another move order under (UTD6.3J). That way, the player has some flexibility in terms of how ships get refitted.
(UTD6.3752) EFFECT OF REFIT: Refitting a ship allows a permanent change to a ship other than the addition of more commander's options, and other than a conversion.
(UTD6.3753) REFIT DEFINED: A refit, unless defined otherwise by SFB rules, is any permanent change to a ship that does not change its hull type. Any change identified in SFB rules as a "conversion" is a conversion, not a refit. Any change to a mauler variant is considered a conversion, even if the hull type does not change. Addition of higher drone speeds to a ship as part of the ship's basic value (which allows the ship to buy more free commander's options as a result of buying the better drones) counts as a refit. Buying more commander's options (including better drones purchased with commander's options), or reorganizing commander's options, or scrapping commander's options counts as a refit.
(UTD6.3754) WHERE PERFORMED: A ship can only be refitted at a shipyard of appropriate size class *and* capacity (exception: (UTD6.3J): Refit Fleet Order). In other words, if you are using a SY activation order to refit a fleet, and if your battleship is to receive a refit, it can ONLY be refitted at a SC2 shipyard with a capacity of 2 (e.g., your capital). A ship may be refitted at a shipyard of a size class larger than the ship. Nevertheless, because a "Refit Fleet" order (UTD6.3J) does not require a shipyard, if that separate order were given, then SY capacity would not be required to refit said battleship.
(UTD6.3755) SHIPYARD CAPACITY USED AND COST: Refitting a ship uses an amount of shipyard capacity equal to half the move class of the ship being overhauled (exception: (UTD6.3J)). Refits cost BPV equal to the difference in BPV between the two ships (if the new ship classification is more BPV) - and are free if that difference is zero or negative. Refits become available by campaign year.
(UTD6.376) COMMANDER'S OPTIONS, EXPENDABLES, AND LEGENDARY OFFICERS: Any ship eligible to receive a refit may also be provided extra commander's options, equipment, and legendary officers (or crew), subject to all other restrictions and the availability of BPV.
(UTD6.3757) COMBINATION WITH OVERHAUL: A refit order can be combined with an overhaul order; in which case only use the shipyard capacity needed for the overhaul. The cost of the overhaul (based on the original hull type) is combined with the cost of the refit.
(UTD6.376) CONVERT SHIP (ACTIVATED SHIPYARD ACTION SUB-TYPE): The following rules apply to converting ships at an activated shipyard.
(UTD6.3761) EFFECT OF CONVERSION: Converting a ship allows a permanent change to a ship other than the addition of more commander's options, and other than a conversion.
(UTD6.3762) CONVERSION DEFINED: A conversion is any change to a ship which changes its hull type, or which is specified as a "conversion" under SFB rules. A conversion is allowed only if SFB rules indicate that the conversion is allowed. If a supermajority of the players agree, the Federation and Empire Ship Information Tables (F&E SITs) may be used to indicate what conversions are allowed.
(UTD6.3763) WHERE PERFORMED: A ship can only be converted at a shipyard of appropriate size class *and* capacity. In other words, if your battleship is to receive a conversion, it can ONLY be converted at a SC2 shipyard with a capacity of 2 (e.g., your capital). A ship may be converted at a shipyard of a size class larger than the ship.
(UTD6.3764) SHIPYARD CAPACITY USED AND COST: Converting a ship uses an amount of shipyard capacity equal to the move class of the ship being overhauled. Conversions cost BPV equal to the difference in BPV between the two ships (if the new ship classification is more BPV) or 25% of the cost of the original ship, whichever is more. Conversions become available by campaign year.
(UTD6.3765) COMBINATION WITH OVERHAUL: A conversion order can be combined with an overhaul order without using more shipyard capacity. The cost of the overhaul (based on the original hull type) is combined with the cost of the conversion.
(UTD6.3766) CHANGE OF MOVE COST: If conversion of a ship increases or decreases its move cost, then the shipyard capacity used for the conversion is equal to the highest move cost of the starting or ending ship types.
(UTD6.377) INSPECT CAPTURED SHIP (ACTIVATED SHIPYARD ACTION SUB-TYPE): The following rules apply to inspecting ships at an activated shipyard.
(UTD6.3771) EFFECT OF INSPECTION: Inspecting a ship both overhauls a captured ship and allows the captured ship to be operated normally by the capturing player, just as he would any his other ships. Do not use an anarchist version of the ship; use the ship's original technology. However, as part of inspection, the fighter bays or PF links of the captured unit are refitted for use with the owning player's fighter or PF types.
(UTD6.3772) LIMITED CONVERSION OR REFIT: A captured ship may not be converted or refitted. As a partial exception, a captured ship with drone racks can be refitted to use higher drone speeds, if available for the campaign year (possibly as part of the inspection). As a partial exception, a captured ship with plasma torpedoes can be refitted to have sabot torpedoes, swivel mounts, or improved torpedo types, if available for the campaign year and allowable for the ship type of original empire (possibly as part of the inspection).
(UTD6.3773) PRIOR TO INSPECTION: Prior to inspection a captured ship can *only* move (strategically and tactically) and operate unreinforced shields – NO other systems may be used – and prior to inspection a captured ship cannot be repaired, refitted, converted, or overhauled in any way.
(UTD6.3774) WHERE PERFORMED: A ship can only be inspected at a shipyard of appropriate size class *and* capacity. In other words, if you capture a battleship (CONGRATULATIONS!), it can ONLY be inspected at a SC2 shipyard with a capacity of 2 (e.g., your capital). A ship may be inspected at a shipyard of a size class larger than the ship.
(UTD6.3775) SHIPYARD CAPACITY USED AND COST: Inspecting a ship uses an amount of shipyard capacity equal to the move class of the ship being overhauled. Inspection costs 25% of the original ship's BPV. If applicable, also pay the cost of limited conversion or refit per (UTD6.3772).
(UTD6.378) INTEGRATED EXAMPLE OF SHIPYARD ACTIONS: The following integrated example shows how shipyard actions are performed.
(UTD6.3781) THE SITUATION: The Lyran player has a wrecked, unrefitted CA of MC 1 in the sector as well as a wrecked captured Hydran CU of MC 0.33. He also wants to refit two FFs to have the phaser refit and also refit the CA to have the phaser refit. He wants to convert an unrefitted DD to a fully refitted CW (allowed for the Lyran DD by SFB rules and year). The Lyran player has all these units at a sector having his capital shipyard. He also wants to build ships if he can. The Lyran player also owns a SC4 shipyard in the sector.
(UTD6.3782) ORDER POINT: A Lyran player spends one order point to activate his capital shipyard. The capital shipyard has a capacity of "2"; thus the combined move class of any ships it builds, overhauls, refits, converts, or inspects must be equal to or less than 2.
(UTD6.3783) OVERHAUL THE CRUISER: The Lyran player overhauls the wrecked CA as an action sub-type. Doing so uses up "1" of the shipyard's capacity of "2". However, the player can also apply the phaser refit without using more shipyard capacity. The cost of the overhaul equals 25% of the BPV of the original CA (133*0.25) = 33.25 BPV. The cost of the refit is either 4 (the cost of the phaser refit) or 10% of the original cost of the CA (13.3), so the Lyran player also pays this cost. The total cost to overhaul and refit the CA is 33.25+13.3 = 46.55 BPV, which rounds up to 47 BPV.
(UTD6.3784) CONVERT THE DESTROYER: The Lyran player converts the DD to a CW. Doing so uses 0.67 capacity because the larger MC capacity is used over the DD's MC of 0.5. The cost of the conversion is the higher of 25% of the original ship (25%*79=19.75) or the difference between the two units (135-79=56), so the Lyran pays 56 BPV for the conversion. So far the Lyran player has used 1.67 of the capital's shipyard capacity and 103 BPV.
(UTD6.3785) REFIT THE FFs: The Lyran player refits the two FFs to have the phaser refit. Refitting a ship costs shipyard capacity equal to half of the ship's MC. So, each FF uses 0.165 of the shipyard's capacity. Combined, refitting both FFs use 0.33 of the SC2 shipyard's capacity. The total cost is equal to the greater of the cost of both refits (2+2=4) or 10% of the original ships' costs (6.3+6.3=12.6), whichever is greater. The Lyran player must pay 13 BPV for the cost of both refits. So far the Lyran player has used all of the 2 points of the capital's shipyard capacity and 116 BPV.
(UTD6.3786) INSPECT THE CAPTURED CU: The Lyran player wants to refit the CU. However, he is out of shipyard capacity at the capital shipyard. Therefore, he spends a second full order point to activate the SC4 shipyard. Note that the capacity of the SC4 shipyard is a mere 0.67 (much less than the capital shipyard). However, now capacity is available to inspect the captured CU; specifically 0.33 of the SC4 shipyard's capacity is used (the MC of the CU). The Lyran player also spends BPV equal to 25% of the cost of the CU, or 61*25% = 15.25, which rounds down to 15. The CU can now be used as a CU by the Lyran player, and it is fully overhauled. So far the Lyran player has spent 116+15= 131 BPV.
(UTD6.3787) BUILD SHIPS: The Lyran player has 0.33 shipyard capacity remaining at the SC4 shipyard. However, the Lyran player can still build a FF. Thus, the Lyran player orders a new FF, fully refitted, to be built at the SC4 shipyard, using the last 0.33 capacity of the SC4 shipyard. The cost is 69 BPV.
(UTD6.3788) UPSHOT: The Lyran player has spent 2 order points and 131+69 = 200 BPV. He was able to build a ship, overhaul and refit a ship, refit two other ships, convert a ship, and inspect a ship.
(UTD6.38) BUILD A SHIPYARD: At least one shipyard may be built at a developed Colony.
(UTD6.381) COST: The cost of a shipyard is given on the SSD per the Campaign Designer's Handbook.
(UTD6.382) WHEN RECEIVED: The new shipyard is received when new construction is received in the sequence of play. The new shipyard may begin building ships on the next owning player's turn.
(UTD6.383) ORDER POINT: One order point can build one shipyard, regardless of the size class of the shipyard.
(UTD6.384) LIMIT ON SHIPYARDS: There are three limits on shipyards built at a colony; all must be observed.
(UTD6.3841) NUMBER: No more than two shipyards can be present at a single colony.
(UTD6.3842) COMBINED SHIPYARD CAPACITY: The maximum combined shipyard capacity of all shipyards at a single colony is 3.
(UTD6.3843) SIZE: Only a player staring sector can support a shipyard with a capacity of "2", and only one such shipyard may be present in a starting sector. The only way that a player can own more than one shipyard with a capacity of "2" is to capture an enemy starting shipyard, or to capture an enemy sector and then build his own SC2 shipyard and designate it as a capacity 2 shipyard.
(UTD6.3844) CAPITAL PARTIAL EXCEPTION: A player's starting sector (and ONLY that player's starting capital) may violate (UTD6.3841) and support a third shipyard (i.e., if you capture an enemy starting sector, you can't take advantage of this exception). A player's starting sector ONLY may violate (UTD6.3842) and have a maximum combined shipyard capacity of 5 (i.e., if you capture an enemy starting sector, you can't take advantage of this exception).
(UTD6.385) NO UPGRADES: A shipyard cannot be upgraded. If a player wishes to have a different kind of shipyard in a sector, he must scrap an older shipyard and then build a replacement (presumably a larger one).
(UTD6.39) REPAIR A FLEET: One order point allows a player to perform D9.4 repairs on all ships in a single fleet, assuming the fleet is at a colony. See (UTD4.335). A shipyard need not be present.
(UTD6.39) REPAIR SHIP WITH REPAIR FREIGHTER: If a repair freighter is present in a fleet, then one order point allows the player to perform D9.4 repairs on one or two ships in a fleet outside of a colony, depending on the size of the freighter. A small repair freighter may perform only one such repair per campaign cycle. A large repair freighter may perform two such repairs per campaign cycle. Note each ship can only receive D9.4 repairs once until the ship is overhauled. However, the ship may continue to repair itself using its own very limited repair capacity.
(UTD6.3A) REVISE DEFENSES: One order point allows a player to overhaul and revise all defenses (monitors, ground bases, and DefSats) in a single sector. Pay for any purchased units normally. One order point to revise defenses allows any number of defenses, plus a supporting repair freighter, to be built (though note that shipyards are built separately using a different order). As part of the order point to revise defenses, defenses that are no longer desired may be scrapped and half their BPV recovered (and some or all of that BPV from scrapping used to buy the revised defenses). Note while that a capital or shipyard may perform D9.4 repairs on itself once per campaign cycle without using an order point, though this benefit does not apply to any other defense unit. Ships (other than monitors) may not be added to defenses. Units built pursuant to "revise defenses" are received when built ships are received (step 10 of the SoP).
(UTD6.3B) REPLACE FIGHTERS AND PFs: Fighters and PFs are replaced in one of two ways:
(UTD6.3B1) FREE, AUTOMATIC: A carrier or PFT is resupplied every campaign turn at step 3 of the current player turn. Therefore, if the carrier or PFT had broken out free spare fighter or PFs on a prior turn, then carrier or PFT automatically receives it's resupply of its spare fighters and PFs at step 3 when a player receives resupply. Such restocked spares may be re-deployed after the end of combat of the same player turn. Thus, slowly, a carrier or PFT will automatically replace all fighters and PFs – for free. For the same reason, a carrier or PFT that loses just a few fighters or PFs (assuming the ship had spares to begin with) won't have to pay order points or BPV to replace its lost attrition units.
(UTD6.3B2) FAST REPLACEMENT: One order point allows a player, for all units in a single fleet, to spend BPV to replace all fighters and PFs in excess of a ship's normal stores. This order is the only other way to replace fighters and PFs lost in combat. The carrier can be anywhere on the campaign map; however, if the fleet is in a sector with a capital or shipyard, then this order costs no order points. Note that under (UD6.3B1), a carrier or PFT could have deployed its spare expendables prior to paying to replace fighters and PFs. If so, then the spares are empty (not to be refilled for free until the next player turn); however, the player then does not have to pay to replace those few attrition units covered by the deployment of spares. If the player does pay to replace all attrition units, then the spares are also refilled. Why pay for all attrition units? Answer: because the player wants to be able to break out spares before his next player turn (and resupply) occurs, on account that the player expects the fleet to fight more than once before his next turn rolls around.
(UTD6.3C) SIEGE ROLL: A fleet may attempt to escape from a fortification. See (UTD4.3561).
(UTD6.3D) DEAD DROP: A dead drop is used to transfer goods to another player; as all players are always "enemies" in Thunderdome III. The sole reason to execute this order is to make arrangements with another player to transfer money in exchange for something (to bribe them leave you alone or to attack someone else, pay them to leave a ship behind for your capture, whatever.)
(UTD6.3D1) CASH ON THE BARRELHEAD: For one order point, a fleet may lay down a "container" of materials worth 100 BPV, costing a total of 110 BPV (this "container" is an abstract representation and never placed on the combat map during SFB play). A sector may have any number of containers at a time. The first enemy fleet to enter and hold the sector having the "containers" receives all BPV in all containers – after – any combat takes place (i.e., you have to hold the sector to get the dough). The containers may not be destroyed during SFB combat.
(UTD6.3D2) DERELICT SHIPS: For one order point, a fleet may carve out a single ship from a fleet and leave it an empty derelict in the sector. A sector can have any number of such derelicts. The first enemy fleet to enter and hold the sector having the derelicts automatically captures them – after – any combat takes place. However, such derelicts may be destroyed using normal SFB combat (the derelicts are placed within 5 hexes of the center of the map, as directed by the former owner). Such derelicts may be captured during combat by transferring a crew and/or boarding parties, but are treated as "captured ships" using SFB rules during the battle. A derelict capture during SFB combat cannot power any systems until the turn after it has had crew units on it for one complete turn from impulses 1-32. This time does not start until all enemy crew and boarding parties have been eliminated (the enemy hinders your attempts at control with their own). Captured derelict ships must still be inspected (UTD6.3E).
(UTD6.3E) TOW A WRECKED SHIP: A ship is wrecked if it cannot move faster than ¼ of its maximum SFB tactical speed (round all fractions down). A wrecked ship is always assigned to a fleet and thus moves with a fleet. However, a wrecked ship must be towed as follows. The owning player must expend an order point to tow the wrecked ship down one warp lane (presumably to try to bring it back to the capital or appropriately-sized shipyard). This order point must be expended even if starting at a friendly Colony. One order point is needed for each wrecked ship so towed. At least one non-wrecked ship must be present in the fleet, and there must be enough available tractor beams on non-wrecked ships to be able to tow wrecked ships. Units which are not towed must be scrapped (UTD6.3K), or carved out as a derelict under (UTD6.3I2) or the fleet cannot move on the campaign map at all.
(UTD6.3F) SCRAP A UNIT: An order point allows a player to scrap any number of ships in one fleet, to scrap one shipyard, or to scrap any number of defenses. Scrapping a unit instantly increases the player's treasury by half of the value of the scrapped ship; retain all fractions. Any fighters or PFs, as well as extra commander's options (above the 10% free), carried by the unit must also be scrapped as part of the same order point (and half their BPV value is retained).
(UTD6.3G) DISENGAGED FLEET: In brief summary, if a losing fleet disengages, then all fleets friendly to the losing fleet must move on the strategic map at step 5 of the next player's turn (i.e., not your next turn, the next opponent's turn). See (UTD7.466) for detailed rules regarding the effect of disengaging a fleet during combat. Reference is made to (UTD7.466) here, because disengaging can require you to use up an order point on your next turn. If your fleet(s) disengage, it (they) are required to use an order point on your next turn, one order point for all fleets that retreat from a given sector (not one order point per fleet; one point for all fleets that leave one sector), even though those fleets moved on another player's turn. Again, see (UTD7.466) for details. As a reminder, you may not take advantage of the colonial free move when disengaging; you must spend one order point(s) to move the fleet(s) on the strategic map. Note that this order (UTD6.3L) might be combined with another pre-spent order point to scrap multiple units under the other conditions of (UTD6.3K) if a non-compliant fleet attempts to retreat to a restricted sector (UTD5.76). All pre-spent order points (from disengaging from multiple encounters and/or for scrapping non-compliant units when retreating into a restricted sector) stack. The accumulation of pre-spent order points can have consequences. See (UTD7.46723) INSUFFICIENT ORDER POINTS, PENALTY; (UTD7.46724) PURCHASING EXTRA ORDER POINTS; (UTD7.46725) NO CARRY OVER OF INVOLUNTARY MOVE ORDER POINTS.
(UTD6.3H) OVERHAUL A SHIPYARD: A single order point allows a shipyard to overhaul itself. An overhauled shipyard cannot perform any shipyard actions (including build, refit, convert, overhaul, or inspect ships). All shipyards may perform D9.4 repairs on themselves every player turn until fully repaired, without the player having to spend order points, though only half of the shipyard's capacity is available when doing so. A shipyard cannot upgrade itself. If a player wants a different shipyard in a sector, he must scrap the old one and then build a new one. A shipyard must have undestroyed "works" boxes to take shipyard actions (after D9.4 repairs, which does repair all works boxes). A shipyard's capacity is reduced by the percentage of works boxes it has destroyed (this can happen when a player really needs capacity NOW, and the shipyard is not badly damaged, and so the shipyard forgoes the D9.4 repairs to not suffer the repair capacity penalty.
(UTD6.3I) ORGANIZE CAPTURED SHIP: In some ways, organizing a captured ship is similar to organizing or transferring any other ship among fleets under the "organize fleets" order in (UTD6.33). However, because captured ships are captured during combat, special provisions are made here when transferring a captured ship to a fleet or to dry dock.
(UTD6.3I1) FREE ORDER POINT: Of all of the orders in Thunderdome III, "Organize Captured Ship" is the only order that is always a "free" order (does not cost order points).
(UTD6.3I2) IMMEDIATE ORGANIZATION REQUIRED: A captured ship must be "organized" during the record keeping phase on the turn it is captured (whether that is the turn of the capturing player or not). A captured ship is "organized" by taking one of the following actions: 1) placing the captured ship into an available fleet (UTD6.3I4), 2) placing the captured ship into dry dock (UTD6.3I5), or 3) scrapping the captured ship (UTD6.3I6). A player may always decide to scrap a captured ship, but might not be able to perform the former two actions. Organizing a captured ship does not "inspect" the ship (UTD6.377) and, if the ship is "wrecked" (UTD6.3E) order points may be required to tow the captured ship.
(UTD6.3I3) FLEET LIMITS AND DRY DOCK LIMITS OBSERVED: All limitations on fleets (i.e., move class limits, SFB rule S8.0 limits, etc.) must be observed when organizing a captured ship into a fleet. All limitations on dry dock (UTD7.6) must be observed when organizing a captured ship into a dry dock position. If a captured ship cannot be placed into a fleet or into dry dock, and the player is not willing to scrap an existing ship to make room for the captured ship, the captured ship must be scrapped.
(UTD6.3I4) ORGANIZE CAPTURED SHIP INTO A FLEET: A captured ship may be placed into any friendly fleet in the sector in which combat took place (assuming doing so is legal), or may be placed into a new fleet (assuming the player has an empty fleet available). Again, the ship is not "inspected (UTD6.377) and, if "wrecked" (UTD6.3E), may need to be towed by another ship in the fleet in which the captured ship has been assigned.
(UTD6.3I5) ORGANIZE CAPTURED SHIP INTO DRY DOCK: If the captured ship is captured in a sector having a friendly shipyard, then the captured ship may optionally be "organized" by placing the ship in an available dry dock position. The ship is not yet "inspected" or repaired; it has simply been organized into dry dock.
(UTD6.3I6) ORGANIZE CAPTURED SHIP BY SCRAPPING: A captured ship may always be "organized" by being scrapped. Scrapping a captured ship immediately transfers into the capturing player's bank an amount of BPV equal to half of the BPV of the ship plus half the BPV of any extra commander's options and attrition units originally carried by the captured ship.
(UTD6.3I7) SCRAP EXISTING SHIP: A player may scrap up to three existing ships in the capturing fleet, outside the sequence of play, to make room for a captured ship in the capturing fleet (regardless of whether the player has empty fleets available). In this case, observe rule (6.3F); however, no order point is required, and the order is completed as part of "organizing" the captured ship.
(UTD6.3I8) NO REORGANIZING FLEETS OUTSIDE OF THE SEQUENCE OF PLAY: Except as allowed by the addition of a captured unit to an existing fleet or to a new fleet (UTD6.3I4), or except to scrap an existing ship to accommodate a captured ship under (UTD6.3I7), or except to organize a captured unit into dry dock (UTD3.I5), it is not possible to "organize fleets" outside of the sequence of play to accommodate a captured ship.
(UTD6.3I9) EXAMPLE: A player has a "full" fleet (maximum MC). The player captures a ship, which is "wrecked", and (because the captured ship can't fit in the full fleet) "organizes" the captured ship into a new fleet. The player cannot (for free) place a non-wrecked ship in the new fleet with the single wrecked captured ship in order to tow it. The player would have to wait until his next player turn in order to "organize fleets" under (UTD6.33) to transfer a "healthy" ship to the new fleet in order to tow the wrecked captured ship on the campaign map under (UTD6.3E). However, the player could scrap up to three existing ships in the "full" fleet to make room for the newly captured ship, and do so using no order points outside of the ordinary sequence of play.
(UTD6.3J) REFIT FLEET: It is possible to instantly refit an entire fleet using a single order point. The difference between a "refit" and a "conversion" is defined above (i.e., see SFB rules, or (if agreed) the F&E SITs).
(UTD6.3J1) WHERE PERFORMED: A "refit fleet" order must be given at a developed colony. A shipyard need not be present.
(UTD6.3J2) EFFECT: The "refit fleet" order allows all ships in a single fleet to be refitted.
(UTD6.3J3) SHIPYARD: If a shipyard is present, and if the shipyard capacity is used, then any ships refitted under the "refit fleet" are refitted without expenditure of order points – BPV expenditures may still be required. Note an "Activate Shipyard" action need not have been issued to take advantage of this benefit (but see UTD6.3751 for interaction with activating a shipyard and refitting a fleet). However, if shipyard capacity is not available (or is being used for some other purpose), then an entire order point must still be used to refit ships (in which case, to reiterate, all ships in the fleet can be refitted).
(UTD6.3J4) COMMANDER'S OPTIONS, EQUIPMENT, LEGENDARY OFFICERS: Any ship eligible to receive a refit may also be provided extra commander's options, equipment, and legendary officers (or crew), subject to all other restrictions and the availability of BPV.
(UTD6.3J5) BPV COST: The cost to refit a ship equals the cost difference between the unrefitted ship and the refitted ship, plus the cost of any expendables or commander's options, or legendary officers (or crew) purchased for the fleet. If the cost difference is "zero" or "negative", then the BPV cost of the refit is free.

(UTD7.0) FLEET ORGANIZATION AND combat


(UTD7.1) ORGANIZATION: A player's units are organized into fleets and local defenses. Fleets hold mobile ships. To a highly limited degree, individual sectors can have defenses. Fleets and defenses are separate from each other.
(UTD7.2) FLEETS: A player's mobile units are organized into fleets.
(UTD7.21) NUMBER OF FLEETS: Each player can have a number of fleets equal to 3 plus the number of players in the campaign.
(UTD7.22) ADDITIONAL FLEETS: For 250 BPV a player can purchase one extra fleet. For 500 BPV a player can purchase two extra fleets. For 1000 BPV a player can purchase three extra fleets. These costs are as listed; do not add them together. An extra fleet is permanently available for the rest of the campaign.
(UTD7.23) NUMBER OF SHIPS PER FLEET: Each fleet can hold a number of units having a combined move cost of 5. Thus, for example a fleet could have 5 CAs with a MC1 each. In another example, a fleet could also have a DN (MC 1.5) and 7 DDs (MC 0.5 each). (totaling 5 MC). In still another example, a fleet could have a DN (MC 1.5), a CA (MC 1), a CW (MC 2/3), a DD (MC 0.5), and 4 FFs (MC 4/3) (again totaling 5 MC).
(UTD7.24) ATTRITION UNITS: Every group of four fighters in a fleet (or any fraction thereof) counts as a MC of 1/3. A heavy fighter counts as two fighters for this purpose. Every group of two PFs (or any fraction thereof) counts as a MC of 1/2. In either case, calculate these numbers based on the combined number of attrition units in the fleet, regardless of which ship houses the attrition units.
(UTD7.25) TRANSFER BETWEEN FLEETS: A player can use a move order (see above) to transfer ships between two fleets in the same sector (and simultaneously transfer extra commander's options and legendary officers between ships between fleets or between ships within a fleet, but see the specific limits that apply to such transfers).
(UTD7.26) RESTRICTIONS: The following restrictions apply to fleets and (in some cases) to the navy as a whole.
(UTD7.261) RULE S8.0: Rule S8.0 applies to each fleet in Thunderdome. If any rule here conflicts with S8.0, then Thunderdome rules take precedence.
(UTD7.262) NON-SHIP UNITS: Non-ship units, other than freighters, are not allowed in fleets. Thus, for example, you may not include the capital, shipyards, priority transports, monitors, etc. in a fleet (exception: during combat, see below). Any variety of freighter, including skids and ducktails, are allowed in fleets.
(UTD7.26A) LEGENDARY OFFICERS: A fleet may have no more than one legendary officer, who is assigned to a ship. A legendary officer can be reassigned to another ship using a move order, but only to a ship that has a BPV less than or equal to the original ship. Legendary officers can be transferred to a ship with greater BPV, but doing so incurs a surcharge equal to the cost difference between the two assignments plus 10% of the BPV of the ship to which the officer is being transferred. Legendary officers are not allowed on battle tugs, dreadnoughts, battleships, any SC2 ship, or X-ships. If lost, legendary officers can't be replaced during the campaign.
(UTD7.26B) OUTSTANDING CREW: A player may have one ship with an outstanding crew (OC ship). The OC ship must have a MC of 1 or less. The OC ship cannot be a DN, a battle tug, a SC2 ship, an X-ship, a stasis ship, or a mauler. The OC ship CAN also have a legendary officer, but be aware such a ship is essentially painted with a huge target. If lost, the OC ship cannot be replaced during the campaign.
(UTD7.26C) LIMITATIONS ON DEFENSES: Defending units must be fit into the MC limitation of a combat fleet, see (UTD7.423) for details.
(UTD7.28) NO FLEET STACKING LIMITS: There are no limits on how many fleets may be in a sector. However, note that only one fleet can fight in any given player turn in a given sector see (UTD7.42).
(UTD7.3) DEFENSES
(UTD7.31) DEFINED: Defenses are units assigned to a sector permanently and cannot be moved (exception:
the player's capital; see above). A home sector may have both a capital and the other allowed defenses below.
(UTD7.32) COMBINED WITH FLEETS: A friendly fleet may combine with any defenses present as described in (UTD7423). The MC limits of the net combined fleet may not be waived. All units (even bases and DefSats which cannot move) have a MC assigned to them for purposes of fleet limitations.
(UTD7.33) WHERE ALLOWED: Only a fortified dead sector, a fortified colony sector, a fortified mine sector, or a home sector may have defenses.
(UTD7.34) UNITS ALLOWED: Defenses may consist of up to 1 monitor, 6 ground bases (if a suitable planet, moon, or asteroid is available), and 5 DefSats. A life sector or home sector may also have a repair freighter as part of the defenses (i.e., the repair freighter is not associated with a fleet); however a repair freighter that is part of the defenses of a sector may never be moved – its assignment is permanent. Bomber bases are allowed, as are any attrition units available by year for a ground fighter base. However, note that the MC limits for any defending units, including attrition units, must be observed when forming the defending fleet under (UTD7.26C2). If a fortified sector cannot support ground bases, then the player may instead purchase up to 2 MC of defending ships (including up to 1 SC3 command ship and up to 6 SC4 ships). Such defending ships are not built at a shipyard, but rather are built as part of a "revise defenses" order - and are permanently and unchangeably assigned to the sector as defending units.
(UTD7.25) RESTRICTED: Unless allowed, a defense is not allowed. Large ground bases are specifically not allowed (MB, BS, or larger).
(UTD7.26) MINEFIELDS: Minefield packages are not allowed; however, a minesweeper that has mines in its mine racks may lay mines during the battle. T-bombs and NSMs are allowed under normal SFB rules. Any laid mines are removed from the sector at the end of the battle.
(UTD7.4) COMBAT
(UTD7.41) DEFINED: Combat takes place on a 60x60 map.
(UTD7.42) WHO FIGHTS? Only two fleets can fight at a time.
(UTD7.421) MULTIPLE FLEETS IN A COMBAT SECTOR, GENERAL RULE: It is quite possible that more than one friendly fleet is present in a sector when combat is indicated, and defenses may also be present. To account for this, each player designates which of his fleets will fight. For example: assume player A has two fleets defending a sector. Player B sends three fleets into that sector on his turn; thus, combat is indicated. During combat, player A selects one of his two fleets to fight, and player B selects one of his three fleets to fight.
(UTD7.422) COMBINING FLEETS, ATTACKING PLAYER: If the attacking player moves two or more fleets into a sector having enemy units, and also spends the required number of order points to transfer units between fleets (see (UTD6.33)), then then the attacking player may reorganize his ships and fleets prior to combat.
(UTD7.4221) THE REORGANIZATION ORDER IS JUST LIKE ANY OTHER REORGANIZATION ORDER: The new arrangement of ships and fleets is permanent until legally changed again on a future campaign cycle. There is no practical difference between using an order point(s) to combine fleets just before combat or doing the same in a sector where combat will not take place; both involve the use of the required number of order points and both result in permanent reorganization of fleets. In other words, you can reorganize fleets with order points before combat, and then you have to fight with just one fleet under (UTD7.421).
(UTD7.4222) NO "DEFENSES" FOR ATTACKING PLAYER: Due to the sequence of play and the requirements of Thunderdome III, it will never be possible for the attacking player to be in a sector where he owns defenses (UTD7.3). Such defenses would have either been destroyed or have driven off an enemy on a prior player's turn.
(UTD7.423) COMBINING FLEETS, DEFENDING PLAYER: The general rule is that the player being attacked will not have the opportunity to reorganize his fleets. He must select one, as it is, and fight with it, without reorganizing fleets. The exception to the rule is if the defending player has defenses (UTD7.3).
(UTD7.4231) COMBINING "DEFENSES" WITH "FLEETS" IN THE SECTOR: The defending player having defenses in the sector under attack must observe the following procedure.
(UTD7.4232) SELECT FLEET: First, the defending player selects which fleet, among multiple fleets in the sector, will be fighting alongside the "defenses" (See (UTD7.3)). At this step, the player may not reorganize fleets or units in any way; simply pick the fleet that will fight.
(UTD7.4233) COMBINE WITH DEFENSES: Second, the defending player then organizes a legal battle fleet (See (UTD7.23) and (UTD7.24)) by selecting any units from the selected fleet (UTD7.4232) and the defenses (UTD7.3) present. See (UTD7.4235) for the move cost of defenses. Any units from either the fleet or the defenses that do not fit into the legal battle fleet are considered "held out" (UTD7.4234).
(UTD7.4234) HELD OUT UNITS: Any units that do not fit into the legal battle are held out until the end of the battle.
(UTD7.42341) DEFENDER VICTORY: If the defending player is victorious, then any held out units immediately return to their respective places (defenses return to being defenses, units from a fleet return to that fleet) – all without spending order points. See also (UTD7.465) for fleet units that disengage during battle, but the defending player is ultimately victorious and holds the sector.
(UTD7.42342) ATTACKER VICTORY: If the defending player loses, then held out defenses are instantly destroyed. (Note defenses (UTD7.3) must be victorious or be destroyed (UTD7.48.) Any fleet units that retreated during combat are treated as retreating per (UTD7.432) and (UTD7.466).
(UTD7.4235) SHIPYARDS AND PERMANENT REPAIR FREIGHTERS: Shipyards and repair freighters permanently assigned to a colony in a life sector automatically combine with and are added to the resulting legal defending battle fleet under this rule (UTD7.423). The move cost of shipyards and permanent repair freighters are ignored for purposes of building a legal defending battle fleet. Shipyards and permanent repair freighters operate normally outside of command rating limits, and ignore any rules which would forbid them under SFB rule S8.0. Note other defenses are NOT combined for free (UTD7.423) and (UTD7.4235).
(UTD7.4235) MC COST OF DEFENSES FOR PURPOSES OF ORGANIZING A LEGAL FLEET: Any small ground base counts as a MC 1/5 unit. Any medium ground base counts as a MC 1/3 unit. (Large ground bases are not allowed). Any monitor counts as a MC 1/2 unit (which effectively gives a very good fleet density). Any DefSat counts as a MC 1/5 unit. Small or medium fighter or PF bases are allowed; however, their attrition units must be accounted for in the MC fleet limits described above. These MC costs must be factored into the composition of the defending fleet.
(UTD7.44) VICTORY CONDITIONS: Combat proceeds until only one player has units remaining on the map.
(UTD7.45) SETUP: Setup according to these rules.
(UTD7.451) BASIC SETUP: Regardless of how they got there, player A (the current player's turn) sets up within 3 hexes of the hex that is 15 hexes in direction F of the center of the map (typically 15 hexes direction F from hex 3030) and player B (the player other than the current player's turn) sets up within 3 hexes of the hex that is 15 hexes in direction C of the center of the map (typically 15 hexes direction C from hex 3030).
(UTD7.452) WEAPON STATUS: Weapon status is always WS-III for both sides.
(UTD7.453) WARP POINTS: The warp points are setup per below (UTD7.461).
(UTD7.454) FIXED MAP; DEATH BARRIER: The map is surrounded by a death barrier (striking the barrier destroys any unit instantly, possibly causing an explosion in the hex from which the barrier was struck).
(UTD7.455) WARP POINT AND TERRAIN PLACEMENT:
(UTD7.4551) TERRAIN PLACEMENT: Terrain is laid down as follows.
(UTD7.45512) LAY DOWN TERRAIN FIRST: Terrain is laid down before determining warp point location.
(UTD7.45512) SPECIAL TERRAIN: The solar system slice, asteroid field, and dual planets terrain types are available as overlays on a SFBOL map. Use the map overlay.
(UTD7.45513) CLASS-M PLANETS, BLACK HOLES, PULSARS, AND SMALL MOONS: Class-M Planets, black holes, pulsars, and small moons are placed as follows: starting from hex 3030, roll 1D6 to determine the direction and roll 1D6 to determine the distance the terrain is located from hex 3030.
(UTD7.45514) GAS GIANTS: Gas giants are placed as follows: The center of the gas giant is placed first. Starting from hex 3030, roll 1D6 to determine the direction and roll 3D6 to determine the distance the gas giant center is located from hex 3030. After the center is located, roll 2D6 to determine the diameter of the gas giant. After the gas giant is laid down, roll 1D4 for a number of small moons that orbit the gas giant. For each small moon, roll 4D6 for distance and 1D6 for direction from the gas giant edge. (The gas giant has many more moons, but they are off map).
(UTD7.45515) DUST CLOUDS, HEAT ZONES, ION STORMS, NEBULAE, RADIATION ZONES, AND SUNSPOT ACTIVITY: These terrain types fill the entire map.
(UTD7.45516) COMETS: The comet nucleus is placed in hex 1050. The tail extends in direction B across the entire width of the map.
(UTD7.4521) WARP POINT PLACEMENT: The following rules govern warp point placement. Rules for using warp points are given under "DISENGAGEMENT", below.
(UTD7.45521) PROCEDURE: First identify to which warp lane a warp point corresponds. Then, starting from hex 3030, roll 1D6 to determine the direction and roll 2D6 to determine the distance the warp point is located from hex 3030. Repeat for each warp point present.
(UTD7.45522) CO-LOCATION: It is possible for two warp points to be co-located. Co-located warp points do not interact nor interfere with disengaging ships.
(UTD7.45523) ROLL FOR EVERY BATTLE: Warp points are semi-chaotic things, so each time you enter a sector and fight in it, roll for the location of every warp point.
(UTD7.4553) INTERACTION BETWEEN TERRAIN AND WARP POINT PLACEMENT:
(UTD7.45531) NO CO-LOCATION WITH IMPASSIBLE TERRAIN: Warp points cannot be in the same hex as a sun, planet, black hole, pulsar, small moon, or other terrain that is totally impassible, or which requires a roll to avoid destruction when moving through.
(UTD7.45532) PROCEDURE WHEN A WARP POINT IS IN IMPASSIBLE TERRAIN: Should a warp point be located inside such terrain, then keep moving the warp point in the same direction rolled until the warp point is two hexes away from the indicated terrain. If, for some reason, this procedure causes the warp point to be placed beyond the edge of the map, then simply re-roll the warp point location.
(UTD7.45533) NO INTERACTION WITH TERRAIN: Warp points do not interact with any type of terrain, even black holes.
(UTD7.456) SPECIAL SETUP, BATTLE ON OTHER PLAYER'S TURN: It is possible for two players to fight each other on a turn when a third player is the current player.
(UTD7.4561) SETUP ON ANOTHER PLAYER'S TURN: In this event, roll randomly to determine who starts in player A's position and who starts in player B's position.
(UTD7.4561) EXAMPLE: For example, there are three players in a Thunderdome campaign: A, B, and C. On turn 1 player A attacks player B in sector X. Player B retreats into sector Y and appears on the next player turn (which happens to be player B's part of turn 1). Player B stays in sector Y on his turn. However, on his part of turn 1, player B attacks player A with a different fleet in sector X. Player A retreats into sector Y as a result of that second battle. According to the rules, player A's fleet arrives in sector Y on player C's turn; however, player B already had a fleet in sector Y. Therefore, player A and player B must fight a battle, even though it is player C's turn!
(UTD7.457) SPECIAL SETUP, MORE THAN TWO PLAYERS: While Thunderdome has been arranged to try to avoid three way battles, it is theoretically possible for three or more players to be in a sector at the same time.
(UTD7.4571) SETUP FOR SCENARIO WITH MORE THAN TWO COMBATANTS: In this event, setup one starting hex for each player in the scenario.
(UTD7.45711) BASIC SETUP: The starting hexes are distributed as evenly as possible around a circle defined by range 15 from the center of the map (typically hex 3030). Afterwards, roll randomly to determine which player starts in which starting hex. Each player starts within 3 hexes of their starting hex.
(UTD7.45712) CAVEATS: It is not possible to start within terrain or within 5 hexes of any terrain which potentially could destroy a fleet (e.g., a black hole, a pulsar, etc.). Simply exclude such hexes from the circle and re-determine the "as-evenly-as-possibly" distribution of starting hexes. Players should work with each other to determine the starting hexes in an attempt to avoid prejudice to any one player.
(UTD7.45713) NO GOOD SETUP AVAILABLE FOR A BATTLE INVOLVING MORE THAN 2 PLAYERS: If, in the rare event that no resolution can be reached for a fair starting setup for a scenario involving three or more players in a sector with terrain, then entirely delete the terrain for this current battle (the terrain is retained for any future battles in the sector). Proceed with the basic setup for (UTD7.45711) on an empty map. Any player in a battle involving more than 2 players that contains terrain may make this demand (though if the sole terrain is a planet or gas giant or small moon in the center of the map, then the demand may not be made).
(UTD7.4572) EXAMPLE: Continuing the above example from (UT7.4561), recall that player A and player B are fighting in sector Y on player C's turn. However, now player C also decides to send a fleet to sector Y. Now there is a three-way battle.
(UTD7.46) DISENGAGEMENT: There is only one way to disengage: to leave via an existing warp point (which corresponds to a warp lane). A ship cannot disengage through a warp point unless it is eligible to do so.
(UTD7.461) DISENGAGEMENT CLOCK: A ship is not eligible to disengage until three entire SFB turns have passed (i.e., the first theoretical impulse of disengagement is Impulse #1 of Turn #4).
(UTD7.462) PREVENTING DISENGAGEMENT: The enemy may have created a condition which blocks a ship's eligibility to disengage.
(UTD7.4621) TRACTOR: A ship held in an enemy tractor is not eligible to disengage without enemy permission. Stated differently, if a ship is under an enemy tractor beam, then the enemy ship powering the tractor has the option of preventing the tractored ship from disengaging.
(UTD7.4622) FORTIFICATION: The presence of an enemy fortification prevents disengagement altogether. There is no way to disengage during combat if an enemy fortification is present, period. The only way to escape a fortification outside of combat is to destroy the fortification (which occurs after combat if you have a minesweeper) or to successfully make a siege roll during the order phase of campaign play (or pay the required BPV to escape).
(UTD7.463) HOW TO LEAVE: To leave via a warp point, simply move the ship into the hex containing the warp point and then, on the next impulse that the ship is called to move, the ship enters the warp point and the ship disengages (following the normal sequence of play). If two warp points are present in the same hex, just announce which one you are leaving through. Multiple ships can enter the warp point in the same impulse.
(UTD7.464) CLOSING A WARP POINT: The enemy cannot close the warp point (exception: enemy Fortifications prevent disengagement). However, once you leave through warp point, then all other warp points are closed to you. (In other words, you can only disengage in one direction). (UTD7.465) EFFECTS OF PARTIAL DISENGAGEMENT FOR VICTORIOUS FLEET: This rule applies in the event that a player disengages one or more units from a battle, but nevertheless wins the battle and retains control of the sector.
(UTD7.4651) PROVISIONAL RETREAT: Any unit that disengages during battle when at least one friendly unit remains on the map to fight is considered to be "provisionally retreating".
(UTD7.4652) REJOIN: After a victorious battle, a provisionally retreating ship must rejoin the fleet to which it was originally assigned before the battle. Provisionally retreating ships that rejoin their assigned fleets do so automatically without needing order points to be spent on the player's next turn. The victorious fleet remains in the sector at least until the player's next turn (unless driven off first by another player).
(UTD7.4653) NO STRATEGIC RETREAT IF VICTORIOUS: Provisionally retreating ships may not complete retreat (and thus move on the strategic map on the following player's turn) if the owning player is victorious. In other words, you stay in the sector until your next turn, or until you're driven off.
(UTD7.466) CONSEQUENCES OF TOTAL DISENGAGEMENT: The following rules apply when the losing player disengages. (See also (UTD7.63L); though this rule (UTD7.466) takes priority over (UTD7.63L) if a conflict is ever noted).
(UTD7.4661) INTERACTION WITH PROVISIONAL RETREAT (UTD7.4651): Once all of a player's units have disengaged from combat, then all "provisionally retreating" units are considered to have completed disengagement involuntarily. In this case all friendly fleets in the sector are considered to be "totally disengaged" and the following rules apply to all friendly fleets in the sector (not just the fleet that was defeated in combat). See (UTD7.467) for further details on retreating multiple fleets.
(UTD7.4662) INVOLUNTARY STRATEGIC MOVEMENT: All fleets that totally disengaged must involuntarily travel to the sector corresponding to the warp point through which disengagement occurred (note it is not possible to go through multiple wormholes). Per (UTD7.4665), the actual movement is executed at step 5 of the next player's turn, not necessarily your next turn.
(UTD7.4663) MOVEMENT ORDER POINT(S) REQUIRED: If a fleet disengages from battle, then on the owning player's next turn, the player *must* spend one order point to "move" the fleet from the sector in which it fought to the sector to which it disengages. This order point must be the first one the player spends. A single order point will cover the move cost of retreating multiple fleets from a sector (all friendly fleets in a sector must retreat with a defeated fleet). Note that, due to the intervening player's turns, it is possible to disengage multiple times before your turn comes back around. In this case you must, on your turn, spend all required move points for each time you were forced to disengage. Note this provision applies each and every time you are forced to retreat, possibly resulting in a penalty (UTD7.46723).
(UTD7.4664) NO FREE ORDER POINTS WHEN DISENGAGING: Disengaging fleets may not take advantage of the "free move" from a friendly colony if the player has disengaged from a sector having a friendly colony (presumably because the enemy that drove them back couldn't destroy a fortification protecting the colony).
(UTD7.4665) WHEN A RETREATING FLEET MOVES ON THE STRATEGIC MAP: Retreating ships execute their strategic movement at step 5 of the next player's turn (not the owning player's next turn). If an opponent is able to jump you before it's your turn again, he could theoretically move to the new sector you find yourself in, and force you to fight again before you get another chance to repair yourself or move out of the way. You can even be forced to disengage multiple times before your next turn, possibly forcing you to spend more order points than you could ever purchase and thus force you to be penalized under (UTD6.46723).
(UTD7.467) MULTIPLE FLEETS AND COMBAT RESULTS:
(UTD7.4671) MULTIPLE FLEETS AND THE WINNER: The winning player retains all fleets in the sector in the condition they are in after combat; they are not reorganized after combat (you must wait until your next player turn to order a reorganization). See UTD7.465 for what happens to ships that disengage during battle, but where the player's fleet is ultimately victorious.
(UTD7.4672) MULTIPLE FLEETS AND THE LOSER: This rule applies when the losing player has multiple fleets in a combat sector.
(UTD7.46721) MULTIPLE FLEETS, LOSING FLEET DISENGAGED DURING COMBAT: See (UTD7.466) for rules on total disengagement. These rules also apply to all other fleets that were in the sector. A single order point covers the move cost of all retreating fleets. Example: Player A has 2 fleets, fleet Alpha and fleet Beta, in Sector X. Player B attacks player A in Sector X. Player A fights with fleet Alpha. As a result of battle, Player A totally disengages surviving ships in fleet Alpha. Fleet Beta must now also disengage in the same direction in which fleet Alpha disengaged, even though fleet Beta did not fight. On Player A's next turn, Player A must spend 1 order point to cover the retreat movement of both fleet Alpha and fleet Beta.
(UTD7.46722) MULTIPLE FLEETS, LOSING FLEET DESTROYED DURING COMBAT: It is possible for a losing player to have multiple fleets in a sector, but all units of the battle fleet are destroyed or disengaged. In this event, the losing player must retreat all non-fighting fleets under the conditions of (UTD7.466); however, the losing player does get the small benefit of being able to decide which direction he wants to go on the strategic map. In other words, if all units of the fighting fleet are destroyed or captured in battle, then remaining fleets of the losing player may be treated as having disengaged through any available wormhole on the combat map. All fleets in the sector must disengage in the same direction. Again, a single order point covers the cost of retreating all friendly fleets.
(UTD7.46723) INSUFFICIENT ORDER POINTS, PENALTY: In the event that the player does not have enough order points to cover the movement of all fleets that retreated before his next turn, then the disengagement and movement of all fleets still occurs; however, if the player uses more order points than he has, then the player may not issue any orders that turn (not even free ones). However, the player still accrues income, and campaign play proceeds to the next player turn.
(UTD7.46724) PURCHASING EXTRA ORDER POINTS: Notwithstanding (UTD7.46723), if a player is eligible to purchase extra order points and does so (see (UTD6.42), these extra order points may be used to cover the order points required to be spent under (UTD7.4663). In this manner, a player might avoid the penalty in (UTD7.46723). Example: Player A has 4 fleets in 4 different sectors. Player A loses all four battles and retreats from all four battles. Player A is required to spend 4 order points on his turn to retreat all 4 fleets to their respective destinations. Player A only has 3 order points on his turn. However, to avoid being unable to use free order points under (UTD7.46723), Player A spends 100 BPV and purchases one extra order point to cover the 4 required. Player A may now issue orders that are "free" on his turn. Naturally, Player A could purchase more order points if he desires, and has the BPV to spend.
(UTD7.46725) NO CARRY OVER OF INVOLUNTARY MOVE ORDER POINTS: It is not possible to carry over "involuntarily used" order points over multiple campaign cycles. Thus, for example, if a player were (by some horrendous catastrophe) forced to use 10 order points to retreat fleets prior to his next turn, but he only has 3 order points available, then the worst thing that happens (aside from those combat losses) is that the player just can't issue orders on his very next turn (only).
(UTD7.47) WRECKED SHIPS: A ship is "wrecked" if it can move no more than ¼ of its maximum SFB tactical speed (round all fractions down). A ship that is wrecked must be "towed" to move on the strategic map – see (UTD6.3L). Note that "wrecked" could be different than "crippled" under SFB rules. This rule must be observed for units that disengage, and accordingly could require the expenditure of even more order points than those called for under (UTD7.4663).
(UTD7.48) VICTORY OR DEATH FOR DEFENSES: Defenses (UTD7.3) may not retreat and may not be captured. They will be destroyed or be victorious. Any unit that is considered part of "defenses" (UTD7.3) that is captured during battle is considered destroyed at the end of the scenario.
(UTD7.5) REPAIRS: The following repair rules apply.
(UTD7.51) TEMPORARY REPAIRS DURING BATTLE: Repairs during battle, whether through CDR, EDR, or repair boxes, break down at the end of the battle; i.e., if you lose a warp box to internal damage and repair it with CDR, then the warp box is marked as destroyed again at the end of the battle.
(UTD7.52) CAMPAIGN REPAIRS AND OVERHAUL: The general rule is that extensive repairs can only be performed at a colony, shipyard or capital. See (UTD4.185) (D9.4 repairs are only performed at a colony and take an order) and see also (UTD4.186) (overhauls, refits, and conversions can only be performed at a shipyard or capital). Exception: repair freighter (UTD7.54).
(UTD7.53) CAMPAIGN SELF-REPAIRS: Each ship can perform self-repairs each campaign cycle. Campaign self-repairs are limited to a number of boxes (of whatever kind) equal to the current damage control rating of the ship. If the ship has a damage control rating of 0 due to battle damage, it cannot repair itself. It is theoretically possible for a ship to completely repair itself in this manner, even if initially wrecked. Campaign self-repairs are permanent.
(UTD7.54) REPAIR FREIGHTER: A repair freighter at a home sector or a colony provides increased D9.4 repairs to all ships being repaired via the repair order (UTD6.39) (each ships DamCon is increased by 1). Outside of a colony, if a repair freighter is present in a fleet, then once per campaign cycle an order point can be used to cause the repair freighter to perform D9.4 repairs on one ship (for a F-RS) or two ships (for a F-RL) in that fleet (see UTD6.3A and UTD4.336). Repair freighters do not increase the DamCon of a ship under D9.4 outside of a developed colony.
(UTD7.6) DRY DOCK: A player may build ships or place captured ships in dry dock if the player does not have space to put a unit in a fleet.
(UTD7.61) URGENT ONLY: If a player *can* put a unit into an available slot of a fleet, he must do so, even if that means putting the ship into a new fleet. In other words, dry dock only applies when there's no more fleets and/or no more slots in a fleet available to place a ship.
(UTD7.62) SHIPYARD OR CAPITAL ONLY: A unit can be placed in dry dock only at a shipyard or capital. A SC4 shipyard has 2 dry dock position, a SC3 shipyard has 3 dry dock positions, and a SC 2 shipyard has 4 dry dock positions, and a capital has 5 dry dock positions. A single dry dock position can hold exactly 1 ship, regardless of the size class or move class of the ship and regardless of the size class of the shipyard. Note that dry docked ships do appear as being docked to a shipyard in combat (with all boxes on the ship being destroyed as "cargo" hits) (UTD7.65).
(UTD7.63) NO BUILDS IN EXCESS: A player may not build a ship if there are no dry dock positions or fleet/fleet slots available. Other uses for BPV may be available.
(UTD7.64) CAPTURED UNITS IN EXCESS: See (UTD6.3I) for treatment of captured ships in dry dock.
(UTD7.65) EFFECT OF DRY DOCK: A ship placed in dry dock is docked to the capital or shipyard. None of the boxes on the ship may be operated, and no other ship can dock to the capital or shipyard at that dry dock position. In combat, the ship is present, but may not be targeted separately from the capital or shipyard. All boxes on the ship are damaged on "cargo" hits taken by the capital or shipyard.
(UTD7.66) TRANSFERS TO AND FROM DRY DOCK: Transferring any ships in dry dock to a single fleet requires an "organize fleets" order (UTD6.33). In other words, a single "organize fleets" order allows the player to transfer up to all ships in dry dock in a single sector (regardless of which shipyard the ships are dry docked at) to a single fleet. If the player wishes to transfer ships in dry dock in a single sector to multiple fleets in that sector, then one "organize fleets" order is required for each fleet receiving the ships in dry dock.
(UTD7.7) SFB RULES USED: All non-optional SFB rules are used. No optional SFB rules are used, unless explicitly allowed. Tactical intelligence is not used. Mines and legendary officers are used (see elsewhere in the campaign rules for restrictions). Hidden cloak is not used. With regard to self-destruction, players may ignore the rules limiting self-destruction and may always choose to self-destruct during the self-destruct segment of the sequence of play (though NPE minor empires are subjected to normal self-destruct limitations).
(UTD7.8) TREATMENT OF CAPTURED SHIPS DURING COMBAT: See (UTD6.3E). Prior to inspection a captured ship can *only* move (strategically and tactically) and operate unreinforced shields – NO other systems may be used – and prior to inspection a captured ship cannot be repaired, refitted, converted, or overhauled in any way.
(UTD7.9) SURRENDER AND SELF-DESTRUCTION: Players may always self-destruct their own units by running into the wall or setting self-destruct orders using SFB rules; ignore any SFB rules precluding such choices (See also UTD3.8). An NPE must obey SFB rules regarding self-destruction, including by deliberately running into the death wall surrounding the map (See also UTD3.8), and thus may not self-destruct unless being boarded. An NPE's only alternative is to submit to Anschluss *before* combat begins (requires no player to be willing to play the disadvantaged NPE fleet).
(UTD7.A) COMMANDER'S OPTIONS: All warships, auxiliaries, freighters, monitors, attrition units, small ground bases, and shipyards receive commander's options (COs). These units are "eligible" to receive COs. DefSats are not eligible.
(UTD7.A1) FREE: Commander's options do not cost BPV at the campaign level. However, commander's options are still purchased using BPV according to SFB rules. Therefore, each unit eligible to purchase commander's options does so with a "CO pool" that is individually assigned to each eligible unit (i.e., you buy commander's options for each unit separately, paying for the COs from a BPV pool that does not cost you anything at the campaign level).
(UTD7.A2) CO POOL: Each eligible unit receives a CO pool equal to 20% of it's campaign BPV (which is the unit's economic BPV). Round *any* fractions up. Thus, for example, a ship that costs 101 BPV would have a CO pool of 21 BPV (20.2, which rounds up to 21).
(UTD7.A3) WHEN ASSIGNED, SFB RULES: COs are assigned during battle setup. Follow SFB rules for all limitations on the ability to purchase COs (e.g., number of T-Bombs, MRS shuttles, troops, etc.).
(UTD7.A4) FLEXIBLE: COs are assigned for each battle separately. There is no requirement to keep the same COs for each battle; thus, you may tailor your COs for each battle.
(UTD7.A5) SECRET ASSIGNMENT, RECORDS: COs are assigned secretly by each player during battle setup. A written record must be kept of CO assignments and, if asked for by the opponent, revealed at the conclusion of the battle.
(UTD7.A6) ATTRITION UNITS: Attrition units form a limited exception to the individual assignment of COs. When buying COs for attrition units, combine the BPV of an entire squadron of attrition units assigned to one ship and then calculate the CO pool based on the total BPV. COs from that attrition unit squadron pool are then assigned to individual units in the squadron. Note that this rule requires that a separate CO pool be evaluated for each ship carrying attrition units. Thus, for example, a Hydran Ranger has 9 fighters in one squad and a Hydran Lancer in the same fleet has 3 fighters in one squad. Accordingly, the Hydran player would have one CO pool for the Ranger squad (20% of the combined BPV of those 9 fighters) and another CO pool for the Lancer squadron (20% of the combined BPV of those three fighters). COs purchased from the CO pool for the Ranger's squadron would be distributed among the 9 fighters in the Ranger's squad, and likewise for the Lancer.
(UTD7.A7) DAMAGED UNITS: Damaged units get their full share of COs, though their ability to use some COs might be compromised (e.g., a wrecked Kzinti ship could purchase extra drones using COs, but if it's drone racks are destroyed it would have to temporarily fix a drone rack and then load the fixed rack with those extra drones).
(UTD7.A8) DRONES: The following rules apply to any unit that uses drones.
(UTD7.A81) MAY BE PURCHASED AS PART OF THE SHIP OR FROM THE CO POOL: Drone upgrades (speed, type, etc.) may be purchased during ship build or as a refit. In this case, the BPV of the ship increases, possibly resulting in the size of the CO pool available to the ship also increasing. Drone upgrades may also be purchased from the CO pool just prior to combat. In this case, the cost of the upgrades comes from the CO pool.
(UTD7.A82) FLEXIBLE VERSUS RIGID DRONE LOAD: Stated succinctly, if you buy drone upgrades as part of the ship then you have to carry those upgraded drones into combat, but if you buy drone upgrades with COs you can change them each battle. Stated differently, drone upgrades purchased from the CO pool are flexible; i.e., you can change your drone upgrades each battle as you see fit. However, drone upgrades purchased when a ship is built or as part of a refit of the ship are rigid and permanently assigned to the ship. For this reason, some players owning drone-using ships may elect to only increase the speed of their drones as part of ship build or refit, and then leave other drone upgrades to be arranged just prior to battle to remain flexible. However, nothing prevents a player from specifying an exact layout of drones for each ship (indeed, this is probably the only way to get a ship with a heavy load of very powerful drones, such as the maximum number of multi-warhead drones allowed for the ship under SFB rules).
(UTD7.A83) EXTRA DRONES: The following rules apply to buying extra drones.
(UTD7.A831) GENERAL RULE, CO POOL PURCHASES ONLY: In order to keep the number of extra drones purchased for a ship within reason, extra drones (i.e., actually buying whole additional drones) must be purchased using COs, except as noted below.
(UTD7.A832) EXCEPTION: As an exception to (UTD7.A831), above, a ship may purchase a few extra drones as part of ship build or refit, depending on the move class of the ship.
(UTD7.A8321) MOVE CLASS: A MC 0.33 ship may purchase 3 extra drones as part of ship build or refit. A MC 0.5 ship may purchase 4 extra drones as part of ship build or refit. A MC 0.67 ship may purchase 5 extra drones as part of ship build or refit. A MC 1 ship may purchase 6 extra drones as part of ship build or refit. A MC 1.5 ship may purchase 9 extra drones as part of ship build or refit. A MC 2 ship may purchase 12 extra drones as part of ship build or refit.
(UTD7.A8322) KZINTI: A Kzinti ship, regardless of type, may increase each of these limits by 3 (so, up to 6 extra drones for a MC 0.33 ship).
(UTD7.A8323) DRONE SHIP: A ship indicated by SFB rules as a "drone bombardment" ship may increase these limits by 12 (stacks with the Kzinti bonus).
(UTD7.A8324) CARGO IRRELEVANT: The presence of cargo boxes on a ship does not affect how many extra drones a ship can carry. Don't ask why. This rule is for play balance, not "realism".

(UTD8.0) campaign setup


(UTD8.1) BASIC SETUP: Each player plays one empire, a year is selected, and players build their initial forces.
(UTD8.11) ALLOWED EMPIRES: Only the following empires are allowed for either players or NPEs.
(UTD8.111) LIST OF ALLOWED EMPIRES: 1=Federation, 2=Carnivon, 3=Frax, 4=Gorn, 5=Hydran, 6=ISC, 7=Klingon, 8=Kzinti, 9=Lyran, 10=Paravian, 11=Peladine, 12=Romulan, 13=Tholian (cast web only).
(UTD8.112) MEANING OF "CAST WEB ONLY": "Cast web only" means no standing web - *period* - not even after Tholians get web casters and are fighting in an asteroid field. Web generators are nothing more than free hits. Note that web casters (and the excellent Neo-Tholian ships) are not available until the campaign year has advanced sufficiently. If you don't like playing phaser boats in the early campaign years, then don't play Tholians. If you don't like the idea of playing "cast web only", don't play Tholians.
(UTD8.113) CONFLICTS IN PLAYER EMPIRE SELECTION: Each player can only play one unique empire. If two players want the same empire, then they negotiate to see who gets it. If negotiations fail, a random roll determines who plays that empire. There is no "I picked first." Negotiations or rolls continue until all players have a unique empire to play. Note that this rule does not apply to ships captured during the campaign; such ships are considered part of the capturing player's empire and are played retaining their original technology (except for attrition units) – no anarchist versions are being used.
(UTD8.12) INITIAL CAMPAIGN YEAR: The default starting year is Y165. If an empire (including NPE) does not have any ships available before that time, then use their earliest available ships. Over campaign cycles, new units, refits, and conversions become available with advancing campaign year.
(UTD8.13) STARTING FORCES: Each player begins with, in his home sector, each of the following:
(UTD8.131) CAPITAL: A capital, which is a SC2 shipyard with a shipyard capacity of 2.
(UTD8.132) BPV: Each player has staring BPV equal to 500+P*150, where "P" is the number of players in the current campaign. For ease of reference, here is a list of starting BPV up to 8 player campaigns: 2 Players: 800; 3 Players: 950; 4 Players: 1100, 5 Players: 1250; 6 players: 1400; 7 Players: 1550; 8 Players: 1700.
(UTD8.133) REPAIR FREIGHTER: A large repair freighter permanently assigned to the capital (see other rules for details for support repair freighters). This "support unit" freighter is the only support freighter that can move on the strategic map together with the capital (when the capital moves under UTD6.32)).
(UTD8.134) DEFENSES: Defenses consisting of a Monitor, 3 GBDP and 3 DefSats (player choice). If an empire does not have a monitor, then replace the monitor with 165 BPV of ships which are considered "defending ships" that can never leave the home sector.
(UTD8.14) PLAYER SEQUENCE: Use random rolls to determine the sequence in which players take turns. As a default, each player rolls D1000 (www.pbegames.com/roller easily supports this roll). Player sequence is then from highest roller to lowest roller.
(UTD8.15) HOME SECTOR STARTING WARP LANES: See (UTD4.174). Each home sector has exactly two warp lanes leading from it. Roll them at campaign start using (UTD5.33).
(UTD8.16) STARTING MAP: Each Thunderdome III campaign map is customized for the current campaign. As a design parameter, all players should have potentially equal access to all other players via warplanes. This parameter is only aspirational, as it may be difficult to fulfill practically. However, the campaign map must be as balanced as possible and approved unanimously by all players prior to campaign start.
(UTD8.2) RESTRICTIONS: The following restrictions apply at campaign startup and throughout the campaign.
(UTD8.21) RESTRICTED UNITS: See (UTD7.264) for conjectural ships, X-ships, and battleships. In short, such units are only allowed if voted in by a supermajority of the players.
(UTD8.22) CARRIERS AND ESCORTS: Carriers and PFTs are allowed, though see (UTD7.265) (carriers must have escorts). Fighters are allowed by year. Refitting a carrier to carry different types of fighters requires an actual refit be performed (UTD1.1862). When available by year, a player may have no more than one squadron of megafighters (12 normal fighters, or 6 heavy fighters) all of which are on a single true carrier. Note the only way to replace fighters and PFs is to scrap existing fighters and PFs and then repurchase the new fighters and PFs as part of the supply step of the campaign turn.
(UTD8.23) LEGENDARY OFFICERS: Legendary officers may be purchased for use on SC3 or SC4 warships. A player's navy can have no more than one legendary officer of each type. If a legendary officer is killed, the officer cannot be replaced for the duration of the campaign. See (UTD7.266) for restrictions within fleets (no more than one legendary officer can be present in one fleet, and transfers are limited).
(UTD8.24) COMMANDER'S OPTIONS: Commander's options are free and assigned just prior to combat. See the combat rules for rules on commander's options. (UTD8.25) EXPLOSIVE AND CAPTOR MINES: Minefields are not allowed to be purchased as such (making buying mines very expensive), but there are limited minefields possible in Thunderdome III (which have to be laid during combat).
(UTD8.251) NO HIDDEN MINES: Mines are always shown on the combat map (though dummy T-bombs observe their normal rules).
(UTD8.252) MINES AS COMMANDER'S OPTIONS OR STANDARD EQUIPMENT: Transporter bombs are allowed as commander's options. A Romulan ship may either start with or purchase one NSM, according to their normal rules. Observe the usual SFB limits on mines for most units.
(UTD8.253) MINESWEEPERS: A SC 4 minesweeper may purchase up to 25 BPV in mines in addition to its T-bombs purchased as commander's options. A SC 3 minesweeper may purchase up to 50 BPV in mines in addition to its T-bombs purchased as commander's options. In either case, these mines are considered extra commander's options. Mines from a minesweeper may not be laid prior to scenario start, which may limit the kinds of mines the minesweeper can purchase.
(UTD8.26) FREIGHTERS: Freighters of whatever type are allowed, as well as optional ducktails and skids. However, Q-ships are automatically identified as such, and no Q-ship can be used to assist in developing mines and colonies for fewer order points like cargo freighters can.
(UTD8.3) ALLIES AND ENEMIES: All players are "enemies" in Thunderdome III; the word "friendly" refers only to your own stuff. That being said, nothing prevents players from negotiating "terms of understanding" so that they take actions which support each other against other players. Players can even pay each other off using the "dead drop" orders above.